Jewish St. Louis news & notes from the past

 

As early as 1880, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune, St. Louis Jewish Free Press and St. Louis Jewish Voice, weekly English-language newspapers; and The Republic, a daily newspaper in St. Louis, reported on some of our ancestors' activities, including leadership positions in Jewish fraternal organizations and synagogues, attendance at parties and other social events, and deaths, betrothals, weddings, bar mitzvahs and confirmations.

 

1876:

 

Dec. 4, the St. Louis Globe-Democrat briefly noted that Morris Fisher [Fischer] had sued his brother-in-law Leopold Kober in St. Louis Circuit Court No. 5 over an order of delivery.

 


 

1877:

 

April 25, the Globe-Democrat said that Morris Fisher [Fischer] had won a $250 judgment in his civil suit against Leopold Kober, et al. Fischer had filed the suit in St. Louis Circuit Court No. 5 the previous December over an order of delivery.

 


 

Oct. 17, Leopold Kober purchased a house for $1,900 at 2527 Clark Ave from the estate of the late Judge Marshall Brotherton, the Globe-Democrat said.

 


 

Dec. 24, among additional purchases from the estate of the late Judge Marshall Brotherton reported by the Globe-Democrat were two more involving Leopold Kober. He bought the house at 1525 Clark Ave. for $1,900 and the adjoining one at 1527 Clark Ave. for $1,400.

 


 

1878:

 

Oct. 28, a Globe-Democrat article describing plans for a Jewish hospital and infirmary in St. Louis noted that Louis Kober had pledged $10 to the effort.

 


 

1880:

 

Aug. 27, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune reported on the 10th anniversary of Deborah Lodge No. 1, I.O., which was celebrated by 100 ladies and gentlemen in Druid Hall in St. Louis: "The tables were laden with many good things, and good care had been taken lest any of the edibles should cause any religious scruples to those present. The repast was worthy of the name of Deborah."

 

The article explained that the lodge had formerly been under the jurisdiction of B'rith Abraham, which had gone out of existence for unknown reasons, so the lodge was operating independently. The officers of the organization were four married women, but besides these women, "the lodge's affairs [were] managed by a board of male officers," including Leopold Kober, who was the vice president.

 

According to the Jewish Tribune, "The aims and objects of the lodge are very praiseworthy, they being purely benevolence and mutual aid. It numbers 65 members, and is the fortunate possessor of the handsome sum of about $1,000. May it live to celebrate its 25th anniversary!"

 


 

Sept. 23, the Credentials Committee for the Second District Republican Congressional Convention in St. Louis recommended L. Kober for a seat in the convention, the Globe-Democrat said.

 


 

Oct. 28, the Globe-Democrat reported that Charles Mason had been jailed for stealing $18 worth of calico from Leopold Kober of 1006 Market St.

 


 

Dec. 10, the Jewish Tribune outlined plans by the Independent Order Free Sons of Israel, Progress Lodge No. 53, St. Louis, to prepare for the forthcoming 6th annual convention of the Midwest regional District No. 2 Grand Lodge of the Free Sons of Israel, to be held in St. Louis.

 

Louis Kober, who at the time was treasurer of Progress Lodge No. 53, was named to the Reception Committee and the Floor Committee for this event.

 


 

Dec. 24, the Jewish Tribune noted the names of the Independent Order Free Sons of Israel, Progress Lodge No. 53, St. Louis, Executive Committee of Arrangements, who were selling tickets to the convention. They included Louis Kober. The newspaper listed the ticket prices as: "for gentleman and lady, $5; single ticket for lady, $3; ticket for gentleman and lady (ball only), $1."

 



1881:

 

Jan. 7, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune briefly noted that Rabbi Sonneschein had performed the marriage ceremony the previous Tuesday (Jan. 4) for Abraham J. Marglous and Miss Dora Sachs, both of St. Louis. [Mr. Marglous was Adolph Daust's business partner, and Dora Sachs was Adolph's future wife's sister.]

 



 

Jan. 8, Miss Fanny Kemble, alias Flora Phillips, described by the Globe-Democrat as a "bouncing blonde" of about 25, was charged with counterfeiting after Leopold Kober, keeper of a Market Street notions store, identified her as the person who had used a fake $20 bill to purchase $10 worth of goods a few days before Christmas. Mr. Kober appeared in the U.S. Commissioner's Office with an ugly abrasion under his right eye. The suspect was arrested at a charity ball when she was recognized by a police officer.

 


 

Jan. 28, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune published an editorial welcoming the arrival in St. Louis of the delegates to the convention of the Midwest regional District No. 2 Grand Lodge of the Free Sons of Israel, scheduled for the following Sunday.

 

With the start of the convention, "our city will have the honor and the pleasure of having in its midst a body of men, than whom there is not a better class of citizens, either at home or abroad," the newspaper said.

 

Lodges in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Indiana, Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota would be represented. "The number of the delegates will not exceed three score, but they will certainly make up for this paucity in numbers by judiciousness and intelligence," according to the Jewish Tribune editorial.

 

"The Independent Order Free Sons of Israel are a representative body in every respect, practicing charity and advancing the interests of American Judaism prominently and successfully," the newspaper said.

 



Oct. 8, the St. Louis Globe-Democrat briefly noted the death of Fannie Kober, 11 months, of 820 Market St. from marasmus (wasting away from protein malnutrition).

 


 

1882:

 

Jan. 8, a Globe-Democrat article about fraternal organizations noted that Louis Kober was the vice president of Progress Lodge No. 53, Sons of Israel.

 


 

Sept. 14, Louis Kober sought a warrant for the arrest of Bridget Joyce, charging her with theft of an earring, the Globe-Democrat said.

 


 

1883:

 

Jan. 19, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune reported on the annual meeting of the Hebrew Free School Society, which had been held the previous Sunday. Among the prominent Jewish community leaders present was Mr. Kober [no first name listed; it could have been Louis or Leopold]. The society was responsible for a school of religious instruction, an industrial school for girls, and had recently added a temporary preparatory class for children of indigent Russian immigrants.

 


 

March 30, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune noted that on the previous Sunday evening, the Sheerith Israel Congregation had held a bal masque, which had been successful, "both financially and socially." Prizes were awarded to the guests with the best masks, and "a handsome fruit basket was voted to the most popular lady in the hall." Among those with masks was Sophia Michaels [possibly Sophie Michaels, Abraham Slupsky's first wife]. Among those unmasked [not wearing masks] were Mr. and Mrs. Kober.

 


 

June 15, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune's "Social Gossip" column reported that the "confirmants in Dr. Messing's temple [United Hebrew Congregation]" included Joseph Kober.

 


 

June 29, the Jewish Tribune published an article about United Hebrew's annual examination, closing exercises and awarding of prizes on the previous Sunday morning. Joseph Kober received his diploma.

 

June 29, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune announced the betrothal of Mr. Jacob Romansky to Miss Sarah Romansky.

 


 

Sept. 4, Morris Fischer was among six men charged in St. Louis criminal court with breaking the Sabbath, but the prosecuting attorney decided not to prosecute, according to the Globe-Democrat.

 


 

Dec. 14, the Jewish Tribune recorded a $5 donation to the Hebrew Free School by Louis Koher [Kober].

 


 

1884:


March 21, the St. Louis Jewish Tribune announced that Rabbi Messing of the United Hebrew Congregation would perform a marriage ceremony on Thursday, March 27, for Miss Sarah Romansky and Mr. Jacob Romansky.

 


 

March 26, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch noted that Adolph Daust and Henrietta Sachs had obtained a marriage license.

 


 

March 30, the Globe-Democrat listed Louis Kober as among the alternative delegates for the Ninth Congressional District Republican Convention from the First Ward.

 


 

April 4, the Jewish Tribune reported on the annual convention of the Midwest regional District No. 2 Grand Lodge of the Independent Order Free Sons of Israel, held on March 30 in Covenant Hall in St. Louis. Louis Kober, former president of Progress Lodge No. 53, was among those enrolled as members of the Grand Lodge.

 

April 4, the Jewish Tribune said that Rabbi A. Levy performed the marriage ceremony that united Miss Henrietta Sachs and Mr. Adolph Daust.

 


 

Aug. 24, a Globe-Democrat article about the Aug. 29, 1884, Republican primary listed Louis Kober among the First Ward election judges.

 


 

1885:

 

April 3, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press reported that Mr. Lippman Sachs and wife of Germany, father-in-law of "our worthy friend Mr. A. [Adolph] Daust, have arrived in the city, where they will make their future home."

 


 

July 6, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that William Floyd was arrested after using a counterfeit half-dollar coin to pay for a ten-cent pair of socks at  Morris Fischer's Dry Goods Store, 7209 S. Broadway. Floyd and John O'Neill also had used the counterfeit coins at Patrick Cummings' bar and grocery, 7404 S. Broadway; and Fritz Uhde's restaurant, 7212 S. Broadway, the police said.

 


 

Oct. 2, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press noted that the B'nai Amoona Congregation on the previous Sunday had elected officers, including Adolph Knoch as a member of the board of trustees. Their rabbi at the time was Adolf Rosentreter, and the synagogue's treasurer was a relative of his, Mike Rosentreter. On the same day as B'nai Amoona's election, Sherith Israel held its election of officers. Their vice president was Maurice Kory, who in 1904 would become the father-in-law of Adolph Knoch and Marie Kober Knoch's son Max.

 


 

Oct. 9, the Jewish Free Press announced that Louis Kober was showing his gloves at the St. Louis Exposition. The display "in the southeast corner of the 'Greely Expedition [Adolphus Greely 1881-84 Arctic expedition]' room has attracted thousands. A greater variety of gloves was not exhibited by any one firm." 

 


 

Nov. 20, the Jewish Free Press reported on the previous Sunday's silver wedding anniversary party at 1000 N. 3rd St. in St. Louis of Mr. Solomon and Mrs. Bertha Marks that was attended by, among many others, Mr. and Mrs. [Adolph] Knoch, Mr. and Mrs. [Morris] Fisher [Fischer] and Mr. and Mrs. [Leopold or Louis] Kober.

 


 

Nov. 25, Dec. 5, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch ran a display ad for Louis Kober's glove business. It said: "LOUIS KOBER makes a Specialty of Genuine Plymouth Buck, Saranac, Dog Skin, Kid and French Castor Buck Gloves. Large Stock to select from. 820 MARKET ST., near Druids' Hall."

 


 

1886:

 

March 12, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press reported that the marriage of Miss Henrietta Scheye and Mr. Moritz Meizner [Maizner] would take place on Sunday, March 21, in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kober, 820 Market St. "The young lady is now living at 1611 S. Broadway, the residence of the bride's uncle, Mr. Adolph Knoch [Louis Kober's brother-in-law]." On March 19, the newspaper added that Rabbi Adolf Rosentreter would officiate. On March 26, the newspaper reported that the nuptials had taken place.

 


 

April 2, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press reported that on Feb. 20, 1886, at the age of 85, Mr. Solomon Kober had died at his home in Breslau, Germany. In St. Louis, he has four children, the newspaper reported: "two sons, Messrs. Louis and Leopold Kober, well and favorably known in business, and two daughters, Mrs. Ernestine Fischer and Mrs. Maria Knoch, honored and respected matrons.

 

"A long life, well and honorably spent," the newspaper eulogized. "A kind and generous heart, ever ready to help others; this patriarch resting in his far away quiet grave, is deservedly mourned by all who knew him."

 


 

May 14, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press noted that Adolph Knoch had moved from 1611 S. Broadway to 1621 Franklin Ave.

 


 

June 25, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press reported the marriage on June 20 of Rosa Rosentreter to Nathan Meyer. Rosa was a sister of Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter, who presided over the orthodox ceremony in the home of their parents at 923 Morgan St. The guests included Mr. Adolph Daust and family, Mr. M. Kory (Max Knoch's future in-law) and his family, and Mr. and Mrs. Sachs (future in-laws of both Adolph Daust and his business partner Abraham Marglous).

 


 

Aug. 20, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press published an article on the Aug. 15 marriage in the Lindell Hotel of Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter of B'nai Amoona Congregation and Fannie L. Plaut. Before departing for their Niagara Falls honeymoon trip, the newspaper said, "Mr. Adolph Daust, in a very nice speech, presented them with a very costly and chaste solid silver tea service. The gift, he said, had come from some of the officers of the congregation, who took this auspicious occasion as the fitting one on which to show their love for their rabbi." Adolph Daust was one of nine synagogue officers who contributed to the gift.

 


 

Aug. 24, the Globe-Democrat reported that Robert Alexander, Henry Smith and Pearl Smith were charged with stealing three pairs of pants from Adolph Knoch.

 


 

Oct. 15, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press reported on the Oct. 10 annual meeting of B'nai Amoona Congregation in the synagogue at 9th Street and Washington Avenue. Adolph Knoch (husband of Marie Kober Knoch) was elected financial secretary, and Adolph Daust was elected to the board of trustees. Elected recording secretary, was Herman Maizner (a cousin of Moritz Maizner, whose wife, Henrietta, was a daughter of Raschke [Rose] Kober Scheye). For Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter, it was a bit of a family occasion. M. Rosentreter (either his brother Michael or his father, Meyer) was elected treasurer, and his brother David Rosentreter was elected a trustee.

 


 

Oct. 22, the first of several "Personal and otherwise" advertisements, disguised as news items, about Louis Kober's glove shop appeared in the Jewish Free Press. It said: "We would, as the winter is now approaching, mention for the information of our readers, that Mr. Louis Kober, 719 Olive Street, carries the best and most varied lines of gloves in the city. The selection of a pair of gloves may seem a small thing, but those who wish to secure durability and neatness, go to much trouble in getting a well fitting pair of gloves. As Mr. Kober makes a specialty of this article, his patrons are always sure to receive satisfaction. For a neat glove, or a good winter wear glove, be sure and call and buy of Mr. Louis Kober, 719 Olive Street."

 


 

Oct. 29, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press reported that on the previous Sabbath morning at B'nai Amoona Synagogue, "Mr. Adolph Knoch in the name of the congregation presented the president, Mr. M. Rosenblum, with a very handsome and costly gold watch. Mr. Knoch in the presentation speech highly complimented Mr. Rosenblum for the indefatigable efforts he had put forth in behalf of the congregation."

 


 

Nov. 12, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press published another "advertorial" praising Louis Kober's glove shop. It said: "There is no reason why people should go along the streets with their fingers in a bunch, thrust every now and then up to their mouth to receive a short puff of warm breath, when Louis Kober, 719 Olive Street, sells gloves at such low figures. His stock is varied and select, and his prices are the lowest."

 

The same issue, in a separate item, offered "heartiest congratulations" to Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kober, who were celebrating their tenth wedding anniversary.

 


 

Dec. 10, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press ran the following item advertising Louis Kober's gloves: "Louis Kober, 719 Olive Street. This is a plain address, but to the person seeking a pair of gloves, no matter of what fabric or price, it is an address that is ever welcome. Mr. Kober carries the most varied stock of gloves in the city and sells them at prices which cannot be beaten in any house in town."

 


 

1887:

 

Feb. 18, in a letter to the editor of the St. Louis Jewish Free Press, B'nai Amoona's rabbi, Adolf Rosentreter, commented on the the tragic suicide of a Jewish vagrant. He noted that Adolph Daust, a member of his congregation, had tried to help the unfortunate man to help himself. Rosentreter wrote: "A. Daust, a merchant of Franklin avenue, gave him three dollars worth of trinkets to go out and sell. He went out and on the first day earned sixty-five cents, twenty-five of which he utilized for eating and lodging for the day, and forty he used to increase his stock. Though only nine days from the time that he went out, he has already paid back the original money loaned him, has now his own stock of goods, and feels highly satisfied at being able to make twenty-five or fifty cents a day with which to live."

 


 

April 17, the St. Louis Globe-Democrat noted that Adolph Daust had donated $1 toward the Grand Army of the Republic fund for their planned Sept. 30, 1887, encampment in St. Louis.

 


 

May 13, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press noted Max Knoch's bar mitzvah: "Master Max Knoch, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Knoch of Franklin avenue, will have his Bar Mitzva at Bnai Amoona Synagogue on the next Sabbath morning. Master Knoch is a bright youth and he will read the whole [Torah] section for the day. Aside of the reading of the Maftir, the young confirmant will address the Congregation. Mr. and Mrs. Knoch desire all their friends to come and be welcome at their home, 1621 Franklin avenue, on the occasion."

 


 

July 22, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press reported that Louis Kober had moved: "Mr. Louis Kober, having connected himself with a prominent wholesale glove house of the East, has removed his residence from 1423 Franklin avenue to 909 Franklin avenue. We extend Mr. Kober our hearty good wishes to his new departure."

 


 

Aug. 24, a quilt and other items worth $20 were stolen through an open window in the kitchen of Mrs. Slupsky of 117 S. 3rd St., the Post-Dispatch reported.

 


 

Sept. 9, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press announced the birth of Solomon Maizner: "Sunday last will be remembered as a happy day by Mr. and Mrs. Moritz Maizner [Moritz and Henrietta Scheye Maizner], 913 North Thirteenth street, for on that day the 'doctor' brought the ever desirable present of a little brother. The Brith-Milah [circumcision] takes place next Sunday when Israel [the Jewish people] will be one more member strong. To Mr. and Mrs. Maizner we say Mazeltov."

 


 

Sept. 27, in a listing of new corporations, the St. Louis Globe-Democrat noted that Adolph Daust was one of three men forming the Hispano-American Brokerage and Commission Co. for the purpose of buying and selling stocks and bonds. The firm had $25,000 in capital stock. The other incorporators were Antonio Marstre and Henry G. Gonzalez.

 


 

Oct. 14, the St. Louis Jewish Free Press noted the re-election of Adolph Knoch as the financial secretary of the B'nai Amoona Congregation.

 


 

Dec. 11, Adolph Daust had a classified ad for his A. Daust & Co. auction business, located at 1104 Franklin Ave., published in the Globe-Democrat. It said: "A. Daust & Co., 1104 Franklin Ave., Auction buyers in dry goods, clothing, hosiery, boots and shoes and notions; commission 3 per cent. Country merchants sending us their orders for auction sales will save 10 to 50 per cent." The same ad was repeated several more times later that month.

 


 

1888:

 

Feb. 10, the Jewish Voice of St. Louis noted that Mrs. Levin Sachs of Jonesboro, Ark., was in town to visit Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust, 1408 Franklin Ave., for several weeks. The relationship was not stated, but the visitor was probably related to Henriette Sachs Daust's father, Lippman Sachs.

Also on Feb. 10, the Jewish Voice published a small display ad and a brief advertorial for Adolph Knoch's matzo business. The advertorial read: "Our readers will please note in another column the business card [advertisement] of Mr. A. Knoch, 1621 1/2 Franklin Avenue, which announces his having accepted the sole agency for Oesterreicher's Chicago Matzos. Mr. Knoch has fitted up an extensive depot and all orders will receive prompt attention."  In addition to selling matzos from Chicago and Cincinnati, the ad said he had matzo meal, potato flour, macaroons and sponge cake for sale. "Satisfaction guaranteed."


Feb. 17, the Jewish Voice reprinted the display ad for Adolph Knoch's matzo business that ran the previous week, but this time instead of saying he was the "SOLE AGENT for Oesterreicher CHICAGO MATZOS," it said "he is AGENT for Oesterreicher CHICAGO MATZOS." And the newspaper ran what amounted to a correction of the previous week's advertorial: "TO MY FRIENDS---In my business card in last week's issue of this paper, I appear as the successor of Mr. Benjamin. That was an incorrect statement. I am an agent for Oesterreicher's Chicago, and the best Cincinnati Matzos. My patrons will find me ready to give the highest satisfaction. I need to be successor to no other dealer. A. Knoch, 1621 1/2 Franklin Ave." Immediately following was a paragraph that seems to have been an editorial admission of error: "Through the careless wording of a business notice in these columns last week, our readers may have been led to believe that Oesterreicher's Matzos were only handled by one dealer in this city. We hasten to correct the erroneous impression." The notice went on to explain that the matzos were available from "the following prominent dealers: Mrs. C. Gregor, 1434. S. 11th St., or Mr. A Knoch, 1621 1/2 Franklin Ave." (One year later it appears that Adoph Knoch may have given up his matzo business. The Feb. 14, 1889, issue of the Jewish Voice printed an ad for Oesterreicher's matzo sales by Moritz Benjamin and another ad for Mrs. C. Gregory selling a different brand, but had no mention of the Knoch matzo business. A letter published in the paper from Leopold Oesterreicher said that Benjamin was his sole representative.)


 

April 1, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch real estate column noted that Adolph Daust had purchased a two-story brick house at 2107 Biddle St. for $3,500 from M. and D. Rosentreter. The Rosentreters had bought the house the previous week for $3,400.

 


 

May 11, the Jewish Voice wrote: "Messrs. Kober and Sol Boehm, Ignatz Hartman have been elected delegates to the Republican State Convention to take place at Sedalia, on the 15th inst. [on May 15]" It is unknown whether the Kober elected was Louis or his brother Leopold.

 


 

May 28, the Post-Dispatch's list of recent births noted that Louis and Minnie Kober of 909 Franklin Avenue were the parents of a new baby daughter, Minnie, born May 16, 1888. [The notice was in error because that was the day Minnie gave birth to a son, Solomon.

 


 

June 8, the Jewish Voice published an obituary for Louis Kober's wife, Minnie Kober (nee Selig): "MRS. LOUIS KOBER: The ways of providence are unsearchable, and it is but the deep, heartfelt faith in the Eternal's Love that keeps us up in the midst of such sad dispensations as was the one which tore away from the Kober family a dearly beloved, an affectionate mother and faithful sister. In her 32nd year Mrs. Louis Kober was called hence, leaving a sorrowing husband and six children, the oldest of whom is but 9 years old [Samuel Kober] and the youngest barely two weeks [Solomon Kober]. She breathed her last on Saturday  the 26th inst. [May 26], and was laid to rest in the Mt. Sinai cemetery, the funeral taking place last Monday from her late residence, 909 Franklin Ave. We deeply feel with our afflicted brother, and can but pray that He in His mercy may heal the afflicted and wounded hearts. Mrs. Kober was one of those Jewesses who in their modest and quiet retirement of their household duties are the real heroines and martyrs of the world! Rabbis Sonnechein and Rosentreter officiated."

 


 

June 15, the Jewish Voice wrote: "Thursday, 7th inst. [On June 7th], Mr. and Mrs. A[dolph]. Daust, 1104 Franklin Ave., entertained a number of their friends at a Brith Milah [circumcision ceremony]. Mr. Daust is a happy papa, and carries his honors nobly." The child, born May 31, 1888, was Harry Daust, the third child in the family.

 


 

Aug. 17, two young relatives of adjoining dry goods merchants took their competition to another level, according to a Post-Dispatch article. B. Diamant's store, located at 1418 Market St., was in direct competition with Leopold Kober's shop at 1416 Market St. On Aug. 8, 1888, "the long smoldering enmity between the houses blazed up into the fire of combat," the Post-Dispatch reported. Leopold Kober's son, Joseph, 18, and Diamant's nephew, David Peterson, 17, were both putting up the rear shutters of the respective businesses when they started throwing stones at each other. Peterson was struck on the head and departed bleeding. Joseph Kober told his father what had happened, and the elder Kober contacted a lawyer and had Peterson arrested. The morning of Aug. 17, all the parties appeared in Judge Cady's First District Police Court. "Judge Cady, after hearing all the facts of the fight, discharged the young men and left them free to fight out their quarrels outside of court," the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

Oct. 5, the Jewish Voice reported the re-election of B'nai Amoona Congregation's officers, including Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter, his brother M. Rosentreter as treasurer, Adolph Knoch as secretary and Herman Maizner as vice president.


 

Oct. 12, the Jewish Voice noted that Adolph Knoch had moved from Franklin Avenue to 1633 Carr St.

 

Oct. 12, the Jewish Voice wrote: "Brother Kober has lost his babe, it was buried last week. We condole!" The child who died was Solomon Kober, the youngest child of Louis and the late Minnie Kober. (According to the St. Louis City Death Register, little Solomon died at 7209 S. Broadway, the home of his aunt, Ernestine Kober Fischer.)

 


 

Nov. 2, the Jewish Voice reported that Messrs. Maizner and Lichtenstein, acting on behalf of the B'nai Amoona Congregation, had purchased the First German Baptist Church at 14th and Carr Streets. "We congratulate our brethren on this happy move and wish them prosperity," the newspaper said.

 


 

Dec. 7, the Jewish Voice wrote: "Mrs. A[dolph]. Knoch was the fortunate winner of the raffle at the Chanukah festival of the Daughters of Israel."

 


 

1889:

 

Jan. 4, the Jewish Voice published the names of the recently elected officers of the Mutual Aid Society, including Adolph Knoch, who was elected trustee. The organization was founded April 16, 1882.

 


 

Jan. 11, the Jewish Voice noted the tragic death of Meyer Rosentreter, father of Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter and Michael and David Rosentreter, wholesale clothiers. He was run over and "almost instantly killed" by car No. 46 of the Benton-Bellefontaine line at 10th and Franklin Streets while walking from a store to his home at 810 N. 11th. "He was thrown down by the mules attached to the car and almost crushed to death beneath their feet."

 


 

Jan. 18, the Jewish Voice published Meyer Rosentreter's obituary. He was Amy Rosentreter Knoch's grandfather. The obituary said: "MEYER ROSENTRETER, who was laid to his eternal rest last Thursday afternoon [Jan. 10, 1889], was born at Gollantsch, Prussia [Golancz, Poland], April 13, 1826, [and] was therefore nearly 63 years of age at the time of his death. He served in the Prussian army from 1847 till 1851. After the Schleswig Holstein campaign, in which he was actively engaged, he was decorated by the King of Prussia for bravery. He was a large-hearted man and pious Israelite. A little over four years ago he immigrated into this country and immediately settled down in St. Louis, where all his children reside, two daughters and three sons, Mrs. Brasch and Mrs. N. Meyer, and Michael, Adolph (the rabbi of the B'nai Amoona Congregation) and David. The main trait in the character of the deceased was his affableness and benevolence. He loved to be obliging. In the short time of his residence here he made hundreds of friends, as his large funeral amply attested. His wife [also] survives him. He has left that which is more precious than all worldly wealth: A GOOD NAME."

 


 

June 21, Carrie Kober, daughter of Leopold and Babette Kober, received a silver medal, the top prize in her room, for attaining a 99.8 average in her examination in the Hebrew Free and Industrial School, the Jewish Voice reported. The school was located at Broadway and Market Streets in downtown St. Louis.

 


June 28, the Jewish Voice reported on the planned consecration service for Congregation B'nai Amoona's new synagogue at 13th and Carr Streets scheduled for Sunday, June 30. Among the participants was to be Adolph Knoch, husband of Marie Kober Knoch. Adolph was to present the key of the synagogue to the congregation's president, Mr. L. Lichtenstein.

 


 

July 20, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch announced that Adolph Daust had acquired from John H. Banker a three-story retail and tenement building at 1325 Franklin Ave. for $9,000.

 


 

Sept. 13, the Jewish Voice noted the following: "Mr. Louis Kober has received notice of engagement from Breslau, Germany, of Miss Bertha Haurwitz to Rabbi Dr. Victor Grabowski of Konitz, West Prussia. The young lady is a daughter of Mr. Louis Kober's sister. We congratulate our friend Kober."

 


 

Oct. 17, At B'nai Amoona Congregation's annual meeting the previous Sunday, the Jewish Voice reported, the synagogue's officers were elected. They included Herman Maizner, president; Michael Rosentreter, treasurer; Adolph Knoch, treasurer; Morris Maizner, trustee.

 

 

Oct. 17, Adolph Knoch also was serving as one of four directors of the B'nai Amoona Sabbath School, according to another item in the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Nov. 8, the Jewish Voice reported the death of Lipman Sachs, father of Henriette Sachs Daust and Dora Sachs Marglous. The newpaper state: "Just as we are ready to go to press, we learn of the sudden demise of Mr. L. Sachs, Carr street near 13th street. He was 76 years of age and a very pious gentleman. On Wednesday morning he had yet attended the services at B'nai Amoona Synagogue, and on the same day as he was on his way to the evening services, going out of his yard, he fell and two minutes later expired. Mr. Sachs leaves several children, one of his daughters being Mrs. A. Daust.

 


 

Dec. 20, the Jewish Voice congratulated Rabbi and Mrs. Rosentreter on the birth of a daughter. This was probably Amy Rosentreter, future wife of Joseph Randolph Knoch.

 


 

1891:

 

Jan. 1, the Jewish Voice reported on the founding of the Menorah Lodge of the International Order of B'nai Brith during a meeting held the previous Thursday in the Bowman Building at Locust and 11th Streets. Among the officers elected to lead the lodge was Herman Maizner, vice president.

 


 

Jan. 23, the Jewish Voice identified David Rosentreter, brother of Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter, as the temporary treasurer of the newly established Jewish Hospital Association, whose goal is to establish a Jewish Hospital in St. Louis.

 


 

Jan. 30, the Jewish Voice reported on the election on the previous Sunday of the officers of B'nai Amoona Congregation's Ladies Aid Society, or Daughters of Israel. Marie Kober Knoch was elected secretary.

 


 

Feb. 6, the Jewish Voice noted the death on Feb. 3 of Mr. Morris Fisher [Fischer] at the age of 59 years:  "He leaves a widow [Ernestine Kober Fischer], one son [Henry] and one daughter [Caroline], one 14 years of age and the other 15. He was a member of the B'nai Amoona Congregation and of various Orders. His funeral took place yesterday afternoon, Rabbi Rosentreter officiating."

 


 

March 12, 15 the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that Adolph Daust had purchased five two-story houses at 707-715 N. 18th St. for $12,000 from Mrs. Eliza Young and Michael B. Young. The newspaper said the property was bought for speculation.

 


 

March 13, the Jewish Voice reported that the Jewish Hospital Association had elected directors, including David Rosentreter and Mrs. A. Rosentreter.

 


 

May 13, the Post-Dispatch noted that Leopold Kober had purchased eight two-story brick houses and one store at 217-231 Russell Ave. for $12,000.

 


 

May 29, the Jewish Voice reported on two separate parties attended by our relatives: "The many friends of Mrs. A. Knoch, 920 N. High St., tendered her a surprise party at her home last Tuesday night. The lady received a magnificent and costly present."

 

A May 14 birthday party for a Miss Sophie Seligman was attended by, among others, Carrie Kober and  her mother, Mrs. Babette Kober.  

 


 

July 3, the Jewish Voice reported on the marriage of Herman Maizner, president of B'nai Amoona Congregation, to Mrs. Bertha Cohen. Rabbi Rosentreter presided over the ceremony on the previous Sunday.

 

The same issue of the Voice noted that Herman's cousin, Max Maizner, and two of his friends planned to spend the 4th of July in Chicago.

 


 

July 17, the Jewish Voice noted that Herman Maizner and his wife were residing at 2834a Franklin Ave.

 


 

Sept. 12, the Post-Dispatch noted that Leopold Kober had paid $3,250 to Mary L. Fanning of Chicago for the three-story nine-room brick building at 212 S. 16th St. Kober already owned adjoining property on the corner.

 


 

Oct. 23, the Jewish Voice, reporting on B'nai Amoona's annual meeting, noted that Herman Maizner, the outgoing president, chaired the meeting, and that newly elected officers included Morris Maizner as financial secretary and David Rosentreter as a trustee.

 


 

Oct. 30, the Jewish Voice reported that on the last "Simchass Thora," Rabbi and Mrs. Rosentreter had been presented a "most magnificent and costly folding bed" in their home at 813 N. 19th St. It was a gift from the congregation's Daughters of Israel and friends. More than 150 men and women attended the party that lasted until midnight. A notable toast was made by Mr. Adolph Knoch, who "spoke in the name of the 'Ladies'." Mesdames Riegler and Knoch were give "special credit for the success of the affair."

 


 

1892:

 

May 22, in a labor notes column, the Post-Dispatch noted that cigar maker Louis Kober had served as chairman of a meeting of the Deutsch Arbeiter Verbund [German Workers' Association].

 


 

May 27, the Post-Dispatch published a list of donors to the newspaper's charitable fund for the destitute victims of the flooding of the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers. Louis Kober donated $1 as an employee of the Mercantile Cigar Factory.

 


 

1893:

 

Jan. 6, the Jewish Voice published an "in memoriam" notice from B'nai Amoona about the death of the congregation's former president L.L. Lichtenstein. It was signed by Adoph Knoch, Morris Maizner and Max Laski. The same issued noted that Maizner had donated $2.50 to the orphan asylum in St. Louis.

 


 

Jan. 11, Adolph Daust paid $18,000 cash to Samuel Bowman & Co. for seven two-story tenements at the northeast corner of Leffingwell Avenue and Mills Street, the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

Feb. 5, the Post-Dispatch reported that Adolph Daust had acquired two two-story houses 1116 and 1120 N. 17th St. from Jacob Kuhn for $5,800.

 


 

Feb. 17, the Jewish Voice reported the death of Babette Kober. The notice said: "Mrs. Kober, wife of Mr. Leopold Kober, 1415 Market street, and sister of Mr. Henry Kohner, died last Saturday [Feb. 11, 1893] and was laid to rest on Sunday. The lady was fifty years of age and had a large circle of friends who sympathize with the bereaved family. Dr. Messing officiated."

 


 

March 3, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. and Mrs. Herman Maizner had moved to 2817 Gamble St., "where they will welcome friends."

 


 

April 2, Adolph Daust sold five two-story brick houses at 709-717 N. 18th St. to William Baker for $15,000, according to the Post-Dispatch. Daust had purchased the houses in 1891 for $12,000.

 


 

May 12, the Jewish Voice listed a table of donors to the Cleveland Orphan Asylum. Among those contributing was Louis Kober, who gave $5.

 


 

May 19, the Jewish Voice published a brief item about an honor for Marie Knoch. It said: "On Sunday evening, May 7th, the Ladies' Society 'Toechter Israels' [Daughters of Israel] tendered a surprise party to their worthy secretary, Mrs. Mary Knoch, at her residence, 920 N. High street, and presented her with a fine gold watch. An elegant repast was spread in the enjoyment of which all participated till the early hours of morning." Elsewhere on the same page of the newspaper was this: "Mrs. Knoch wishes to express her thanks to the Ladies' Society 'Toechter Israels' for the valuable present which they presented to her as a token of their friendship."

 


 

July 7, the Jewish Voice announced that "Messrs. Moses Strauss and Max Maizner left on Monday morning for Evansville, there to enjoy our National Independence Day."

 


 

July 14, the Jewish Voice published a list of St. Louis children who were then "inmates" of the Cleveland Orphan Asylum. They included "Phillipine, Flora, and Aron Kober," who apparently were Louis Kober's children. His wife, Minnie Selig Kober, had died May 26, 1888, making him a single parent. That may have been when Louis's children had to be sent to the orphans home. Louis donated $5 to the asylum in May 1893. Jewish children were sent to the Cleveland asylum for a variety of reasons other than their status as orphans. In this case, it appears that the burdens of single parenthood may have been too much for Louis, so he sent his younger children to be cared for temporarily in the Cleveland Orphan Asylum. There was no known "Phillipine" in the Kober family, but, because she was listed along with Flora and Aron (Arthur Aaron), it is likely that she was Carrie.

 


 

July 28, the Jewish Voice noted that "Mr. Max Maizner left Sunday p.m. for a two weeks' vacation, which will be spent viewing the splendors of the World's Columbian Exposition [in Chicago] and taking a tour of Lake Michigan."

 


 

Aug. 4, the Jewish Voice wrote that "Mrs. M[ichael] Rosentreter [aunt of the future Amy Rosentreter Knoch] and her mother, Mrs. M. Wieder, left on Sunday last for Atlantic City, where it is hoped they will be benefited by the ocean breezes."

 


 

Sept. 22, the Jewish Voice announced the opening of the Messrs. John Moser & Co. store at 812 Olive street, selling "a full line of umbrellas and parasols," as well as re-covering and repairing them. "Mr. Knoch, who is connected with the above firm, will take pleasure in calling on the customers."

 

A separate item also published on Sept. 22 described a birthday party held for Miss Edna Block. It was attended by, among others, Carrie Kober. "A sumptuous repast was served and the evening was pleasantly spent in music and dancing."

 


 

Oct. 20, the Jewish Voice briefly noted that a 21st birthday party held for Mr. Chas. Levy was attended by, among others, Max Maizner. "The auspicious occasion was enhanced by a delightful banquet."

 


 

Nov. 10, the Jewish Voice listed the young men who helped celebrate Mr. Jake Punch's "entrance into manhood's domain and the privilege of citizenship." They included Max Maizner.

 


 

Nov. 24, the Jewish Voice listed D[avid] Rosentreter as vice president of the Jewish Hospital Association of St. Louis. The same issue noted that D. Rosentreter had donated $10 and his brother Adolph Rosentreter had donated $5 to the Orphan Asylum at Cleveland.

 


 

Nov. 24, the Jewish Voice reported the death of 4-year-old Leon Daust, son Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust, 3534 Chestnut St. 

 


 

Dec. 29, the Jewish Voice published a brief article on a surprise party for Miss Jennie Miller held in her home. The guests included Max Knoch.

 


 

1894:

 

Jan. 5, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. Max Maizner had returned to St. Louis after having spent New Year's Day as the guest of Mr. M. Strauss in Evansville, Ind.

 


 

March 23, Louis Kober outlined his socialist views in a letter to the editor of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as follows:  "In the 'People's Forum' of March 5 [1894] a correspondent says: 'There is no difference between the Republican and Democratic protection---one is a pirate and the other a robber, and we decline both.'  Now, would it not be better for the people of the United States to adopt the co-operative system of the Socialist Democratic party, where no taxes of any kind would bother the people, and no disturbance of any kind, as high or low tariff, would exist?  No panics would be known; neither will it produce millionaires; neither would we have 4,090,000 people unemployed on the other side; neither would it be a necessity to send men to Congress who have no knowledge at all of manufacture to create laws affecting manufacturing.  In the Industrial State each product of industry will and should have their own commission, with practical understanding of it, and to manage it, and the management would not be a failure."

 


 

March 23, the Jewish Voice announced that Mr. and Mrs. M. Rosentreter were planning to leave for Germany in May to visit Mr. Rosentreter's relatives.

 


 

May 11, the Jewish Voice published a brief article noting that Mr. and Mrs. M. Rosentreter had left for New York, where they were to sail on May 15 for "the old world, where they will spend a year, seeking health and pleasure."

 


 

May 18, the Jewish Voice announced that Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Knoch, 1015 Selby Place, would be at home over the weekend to accept visitors to celebrate their son Henry Knoch's bar mitzvah at B'nai Amoona synagogue that Saturday.

 


 

May 25, the Jewish Voice reported on a surprise party for Mr. Louis Wolfort held in the home of Mrs. C. Lears, 2605 Chestnut St. The guests included Carrie Kober. "Dancing was a special feature of the evening, after which supper was served."

 


 

May 25, the Jewish Voice noted that Max Maizner had celebrated "the attainment of his majority by a dinner given in his honor at the residence of this uncle, Mr. A.M. Hellman."

 


 

Aug. 31, Max Maizner had been entertaining a friend, Mo. Strauss of Evansville, Mo., for about a week, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Sept. 28, the Jewish Voice reported that David Rosentreter, an uncle of Joseph R. Knoch's wife, Amy, owned 12 farms in Washington County, Mo., where four Jewish families had been allowed to settle rent free.  Because of his generosity to this group of farmers, the area was known as "The Rosentreter Colony."  Other farmers in the county lived and worked on their own land. Washington County is located about 80 miles south-southwest of St. Louis. (In modern times, an artifact of the presence of Jewish farmers in the area remains in the form of the small town of Levy, Mo.)

 


 

Oct. 26, the Jewish Voice noted that Max Maizner and Carl Loeb had spent the previous Sunday visiting a friend, Mr. N. Sanger and family, in Belleville, Ill.

 


 

1895:

 

Jan. 25, Max Knoch successfully passed the pharmacy examination before the Missouri State Board of Pharmacy, according to the Jewish Voice. He was one of 15 who passed among 53 applicants. He was the only Jew.

 

On the same date, a separate item noted that Amy Rosentreter Knoch's father, Adolph Rosentreter, had been elected vice president of B'nai Amoona Congregation.

 


 

Feb. 15, articles of incorporation had been filed for the Hub Mercantile Company by Michael Rosentreter, Adolph Daust, Gusta and John Jacobs, and David Greenswald, the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

March 12, at a convention of the Socialist Labor Party, Louis Kober was nominated to run for the St. Louis House of Delegates, the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

June 21, the Jewish Voice listed donations made by St. Louisans to the Safed, Palestine, Orphan Asylum and Girls' School, including $3 from Adolph Daust.

 


 

July 12, among the donors to the Safed, Palestine, Orphan Asylum and Girls' School listed in the Jewish Voice were Adolph Knoch, $2; Dr. A. Rosentreter, $3; and Rosentreter Bros., $3.

 

In the same issue, the Jewish Voice noted in a separate article that Philipine Kober of St. Louis had been confirmed. She was an inmate at the time of the Cleveland Orphan Asylum, where she had been admitted July 1888. Philipine was most likely Carrie Kober, whose mother, Minnie Segal Kober, had died two months before Philipine entered the orphans home. The fact than Carrie was born Feb. 6, 1879, tends to verify her identity as Philipine because that birth date would have made her age 16, an appropriate age for the confirmation.

 


 

July 19, the Jewish Voice noted that Max Maizner would be making his home in the future with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. A.M. [Abraham M. and Rosa] Hellman of 5025 McPherson Ave.

 


 

Aug. 16, the Jewish Voice published the following notice: "Mr. and Mrs. Herman Sachs, of Dexter, Mo., will pay their relatives, Mr. and Mrs. A. Marglous, at Grand Tower, Ill., a visit and from there they will go to St. Louis, where Mr. Sachs will buy his fall goods. They will be 'at home' at Mr. and Mrs. J. Wallstein's."

 


 

Dec. 20, Ludwig Knoch and Carrie Kober were among the guests at a dance party held in the home of a friend, Ida Hyman, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

1896:

 

 

Jan. 3, the Jewish Voice announced that Mrs. Adolph Knoch was elected secretary of the Toechter Israels Ladies' Society.

 


 

Feb. 28, the Jewish Voice noted that the Slupsky-Fischer wedding had taken place the previous week in the bride's Carondelet home. "It was a jolly affair in every respect, and the happy couple were duly honored with gifts, telegrams, etc. Mr. and Mrs. Slupsky receive their friends at their elegant home, 3319 Laclede Avenue."

 


 

March 6, the Toechter Israel Ladies' Society held a party honoring the ten years of service by Mr. Cecilie Riegler, their president.  Mrs. Adolph Knoch, who helped organize the event, spoke on behalf the the organization and presented Mrs. Riegler with a gold medal.

 


 

March 6, due to a legal requirement for candidates for public office to report their campaign expenses to the St. Louis Recorder of Deeds, the Post-Dispatch learned that Louis Kober, a Socialist-Labor candidate for the school board had spent 50 cents on his campaign.  Kober told the newspaper, "One of our great principles is to not spend any money as a candidate for election purposes."  He said he gave the 50 cents to his party's central committee to pay for printing and distribution of the party's platform.

 


 

April 28, Jacob Miller, "colored," was charged with stealing 65 hats and a lot of gold cuff buttons from A. Daust & Co., 622 N. 9th St. The items were worth $70, the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

June 5, Adolph Daust was listed by the Jewish Voice as having donated $5 to the Cleveland Orphans Home.

 

In the same issue of the Jewish Voice, it was announced that a surprise party for Miss Ray Klein had been attended by, among others, Carrie Kober, Ludwig Knoch and Sam Kober.

 


 

Aug. 16, the Jewish Voice listed S. [Samuel] Kober as having graduated from high school.

 


 

Aug. 16, at the state convention of the Socialist-Labor Party in Walhalla Hall in St. Louis, Louis Kober was named to the committee responsible for writing the party platform, the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

Oct. 2, at the annual meeting of B'nai Amoona Congregation, Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter was re-elected, and Jacob Slupsky and Dave Rosentreter were elected to the board of trustees, the Jewish Voice announced.

 


 

Dec. 18, among those participating in the Ideal euchre club's meeting was Joseph Kober, who won the gentlemen's second prize, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

1897:

 

April 30, Carrie Kober was among the guests at a party hosted by Miss Ida Wertheimer, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

June 25, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust of 3534 Chestnut Street would be spending a few weeks visiting New York and Long Branch, N.J., while their children, Mollie, Fannie, Harry and Herbert, would be visiting Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous, Mrs. Daust's sister and brother-in-law, in Grand Tower, Ill.

 


 

July 23, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust returned to St. Louis after visiting New York; Washington, D.C.; Niagara Falls; Detroit; and Rockaway, N.J.  On their return, Mrs. Daust joined their children, Mollie, Fannie, Harry and Herbert, who were visiting Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous, Mrs. Daust's sister and brother-in-law, in Grand Tower, Ill.

 


 

Aug. 27, the Jewish Voice announced that Carrie Kober (daughter of Leopold Kober) of 4375 Evans Ave. was engaged to Mr. Abraham Bischoff of New York, formerly of St. Louis. [There is no evidence of this marriage ever taking place. Caroline Kober married Isidor Victor Weisskopf around 1900.]

 


 

Oct. 1, the 25th wedding anniversary of  Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Knoch was announced in the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Oct. 29, at a meeting of the Nil Desperandum euchre club, Carrie Kober won one of the prizes, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Dec. 17, at another meeting of the Nil Desperandum euchre club, this one hosted by Carrie Kober in her home, she won one of the prizes, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

1898:

 

Jan. 14, at a meeting of the Nil Desperandum euchre club, Carrie Kober won one of the prizes, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Jan. 21, Carrie Kober was among the participants at a meeting of the Nil Desperandum euchre club, the Jewish Voice noted.

 


 

Feb. 4, the guests at a "blue" luncheon at the home of Esther Ruppin included Carrie Kober, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Feb. 18, Carrie Kober was among the participants at a meeting of the Nil Desperandum euchre club, the Jewish Voice noted.

 


 

April 15, at a meeting of the Montefiore euchre club, Carrie Kober was among the prize winners, the Jewish Voice said. Miss Kober [daughter of Louis Kober], of 1021 N. 17th St., was to be the hostess of the next meeting.

 


 

June 17, the Jewish Voice listed donations to the Cleveland Orphans Home, including $10 from M. & D. Rosentreter and $5 from A. Daust & Co.

 

In the same issue of the Jewish Voice, the bar mitzvah of Meyer Marglous, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Marglous of Grand Tower, Ill., at B'nai Amoona was noted. The Marglouses were staying at the St. Louis home of Mrs. Marglous's sister, Mrs. Adolph Daust, 3524 Chestnut St.

 


 

Aug. 26, a list of Jewish employees of the St. Louis Post Office was published in the Jewish Voice: Adolph and Max Colonna, S.S Boutelje, Will Sacks, Victor Moss, Eli Silverstein, Sam Seelig, Sam Kober, Solomon Godhelp and Benjamin Levy.

 

The same issue of the Jewish Voice noted that Max Knoch, Dave Desberger and Joe Goldman had spent the previous Sunday with Max Linsky of the firm Marglous and Linsky at Mascoutah, Ill.

 


 

Sept. 16, Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Marglous and their son, Theo, of Mascoutah, Ill., were visiting Mrs. Marglous' parents, Mr. and Mrs. N. Linsky, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Sept. 30, the Jewish Voice noted that Mrs. Theo. Marglous and family had returned from a three-month stay in Manitou and Colorado Springs.

 


 

Oct. 14, Mrs. Theo. Marglous had moved from 3456 Shenandoah Ave. to 3644 Flad Ave., according to the Jewish Voice.

 

The newspaper also published a short article about the annual meeting of B'nai Amoona Congregration. The board of directors included David Rosentreter and Moritz Maizner. The cemetery directors included Jacob Slupsky.

 


1899:

 

Jan. 30, the Jewish Voice announced that Joe Knoch of Selby Place would be bar mitzvah at B'nai Amoona synagogue on the following Sabbath morning.

 


 

March 3, at a grand euchre and hop given by the United Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society,  Sam Kober was among the prize winners, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

April 14, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. and Mrs. Morris Marglous and their son Theodore of Mascoutah, Ill., were visiting her sister and his husband, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lippman, in St. Louis.

 


 

June 2, Joseph Kober was among 50 members of the St. Louis Young Men's Hebrew Association who attended a banquet and vaudeville program at the YMHA home, 2737 Locust St., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

June 30, the Jewish Voice listed recent donations to the Jewish Orphans Asylum in Cleveland, including $10 from M. & D. Rosentreter and $5 from A. Daust & Co.

 


 

July 7, Herman Maizner, secretary of the Baroness Clara de Hirsch Society, said the society would meet July 12 in B'nai Amoona's vestry rooms, the Jewish Voice reported.  Tickets for the society's planned July 23 picnic at Meramec Highlands were available for purchase at M. Rosentreter & Co., 7th Street and Carr Avenue; and H. Maizner, 924 N. High St.


 

July 28, Herman Maizner was among the new members of the YMHA, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Aug. 4, officers of the Jewish Hospital Association included Herman Maizner, third vice president; and David Rosentreter, member of the board of directors.


 

Aug. 25, the Jewish Voice reported that Joseph Kober was among the YMHA members who had been effective recruiters for the organization. Among the new members was I.V. Weisskopf of 4331 Page Ave.

 


 

Sept. 27, the Jewish Voice said that Miss Fannie Seelig of Milwaukee, formerly of St. Louis, was visiting her cousin, Miss Carrie Kober [daughter of Louis Kober] of 1709a Goode Ave.

 


 

Oct. 6, both Carrie Kobers were mentioned in this issue of the Jewish Voice. The engagement of Carrie Kober [daughter of Leopold Kober] of 2444 N. Grand Ave. to Mr. I. Victor Weisskopf was announced.

 

Her cousin, the other Carrie Kober [daughter of Louis Kober] of 1709 Goode Ave. had hosted the previous Thursday evening a "pleasant gathering" in honor of her cousin, Miss Fannye [Fannie] Seelig of Milwaukee. Attending the large party were several relatives, including Carrie, Flora and Samuel Kober; Max, Ludwig and Henry Knoch; and Fannie's brothers, Samuel and Theodore Seelig. Jake Romansky, who several years later would marry the Carrie Kober who hosted this gathering, was also present.

 


 

Oct. 27, the Jewish Voice said that I.V. Weisskopf and A. Daust were members of the arrangements committee planning a carnival for the YMHA. Joseph Kober was serving on the program committee for the carnival.

 

Also in that issue, the Jewish Voice noted the engagement of Sam Seelig to Jessie Davidson of New Orleans, formerly of St. Louis.

 


Dec. 22, Samuel Kober won a prize at a recent meeting of the Fin de Siecle euchre club. In a separate item, he was listed among the guests at a party hosted by Miss Sarah Jacques.

 


 

1900:

 

Jan. 5, Miss Hannah Guckenheim of 3652 S. Jefferson Ave. hosted a progressive euchre party in honor of her friend Miss Fannye Seelig of Milwaukee, the Jewish Voice said. The guest of honor won second prize, and Sam Kober won a first prize. Carrie Kober was also among the guests.

 

The same issue of the Jewish Voice noted that Jacob Romansky had attended a New Year's Eve party held in honor of Miss Bertha Baum.

 

A separate item in that issue mentioned that Max Maizner had held a New Year's stag party at his home, 4011 Olive St.

 


 

Jan. 19, the Jewish Voice noted that Mrs. Mayer Marglous and her daughter, Melvine Marglous, of Lebanon, Ill., were visiting Mrs. Marglous's parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Spieldoch in St. Louis.

 

The same issue mentioned that Theo. Seelig was one of the prize winners at a meeting of the Fin de Siecle euchre club.

 


 

Jan. 26, the Jewish Voice announced that Mr. Kober was a prize winner at a meeting of the Fin de Siecle euchre club.

 

Also mentioned in that issue of the Voice was a red, white and blue luncheon held by Mrs. I. Seelig of 2716 Allen Ave. in honor of Miss Rae Joseph of Cincinnati and Miss Fannye Seelig of Milwaukee.

 


 

Feb. 2, Miss Bessie Lederer of 4804 Delmar Blvd. held a luncheon for her friend Miss Fannye Seelig the Jewish Voice reported. Among the dozen or so guests was Carrie Kober.

 


 

March 2, Miss Rose Rosenstein of Chicago was visiting her sister, Mrs. I. Seelig of 2716 Allen Ave., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

March 9, the Jewish Voice noted that A. Daust & Co. had donated $100 to the St. Louis Jewish Hospital Association.

 


 

April 23, The Republic, a daily newspaper in St. Louis, reported that Mrs. Salo Daust of 305 S. 2nd Street called the police when she became alarmed by the strange behavior of a neighbor, Mary Cherry, 36, a seamstress who "insisted on singing early and late, and sometimes disturbing the slumber of her neighbors, who did not appreciate her musical voice." Miss Cherry was taken to the City Hospital and held for observation after Mrs. Daust "saw her wrapped in a sheet, her long, dark hair hanging down her back, rehearsing the mad scene from 'Lucia'," the Republic reported. Mrs. Daust was worried that Cherry might hurt herself, so she had the police take Cherry into custody. 

 


 

April 27, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. & Mrs. Leon Seelig of West Olive Street celebrated their 20th wedding anniversary.

 


 

May 4, the Jewish Voice noted the recent death of Rabbi Philip Weisskopf as follows:  "Our young friend Mr. I.V. Weisskopf some time ago received the sad tidings of the death of his venerated father, Rev. Philip Weisskopf at Prague, Bohemia, after having reached the age of 75 years. Deceased was formerly Rabbi at Kasslowitz, Bohemia, but had retired into privacy years ago.  Besides his wife, who is expected to pass her declining years in this country where she will soon arrive, leaves the following children in this country: Mrs. L. Reich, and Mr. Camillus Weisskopf, Las Vegas, N.M; Mesdames A. Bierman and E. Bibo, and Mr. S. Weisskopf, formerly a student at the N.Y. Rabbinical Seminary, San Francisco, and Mr. J.V. Weisskopf in this city [St. Louis]. We condole."

 


 

June 8, the Jewish Voice announced the marriage of Carrie Kober and Isidor Victor Weisskopf as follows: "The many friends of Miss Carrie Kober and Mr. Isidor Weiskopf will be glad to learn of their marriage on Wednesday, May 30th, at the residence of [United Hebrew Congregation Rabbi] Rev. Dr. [Henry J.] Messing, 4439 Delmar Ave. The ceremony was performed in the presence of the bride's father [Leopold Kober] and brother [Joseph Kober] and the groom's friends, Drs. Bernard S. Simpson and Ernst Saxl."

 


 

June 11, Louis Kober of 1709 Good Ave. was listed as a member of the executive board of the Franchise Repeal Association, an activist labor group formed to seek the repeal of the St. Louis Transit Co.'s franchise, according to the Republic and the Post-Dispatch. At the time, transit employees had been on strike since May 8. (For more information about this violent strike, see http://tinyurl.com/28mjcmf )

 


 

June 15, the Post-Dispatch listed Joseph Knoch among the graduates of Stoddard Elementary School.

 


 

July 6, the Jewish Voice reported that among recent donations to the Cleveland Orphan Asylum were $10 from M. & D. Rosentreter and $5 each from A. Daust Hat Co. and Theodore S. Marglous.

 


 

July 27, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. A.J. Marglous and his daughter Fannie, of 338 Chestnut St., and Master Leo Lippman of 3063 Thomas St. were guests the previous Sunday at the Mascoutah, Ill., home of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Marglous.

 


 

Aug. 10, Miss Carrie Kober, formerly of 1709a Goode Ave. was visiting Milwaukee, the guest of her cousin Miss Fanny Seelig, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Aug. 24, the wedding party for Miss Clara Joachim and Mr. Louis Meyerson on Aug. 14 included Mr. M. Rosentreter as best man, according to the Jewish Voice. Other guests included Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust and their daughter Mollie, and Mr. and Mrs. M. and D. Rosentreter and Emma Rosentreter. Rev. A. Rosentreter presided over the nuptials.

 


 

Aug. 29, the Republic reported that Fred Ziegenhein, secretary (and nephew) of St. Louis Mayor Henry Ziegenhein, had refused to grant permission for an outdoor political rally to Louis Kober and Charles J. Meyer of the Social Democratic Party. The secretary said that no permits were being granted for any outdoor political rallies that year and that when political groups gathered outdoors, it would be up to the police to decide whether order was being maintained.

 


 

Sept. 7, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. and Mrs. Morris Maizner of 914 N. High St. were inviting friends and relatives to B'nai Amoona for the bar mitzvah on the following day of their son, Solomon.

 

Also on Sept. 7, among the donors to the Moses Montefiore Ladies' Charity Society were Jacob Romansky, who gave $15, and Rabbi M. Rosentreter, who donated $50, reported the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Sept. 12, after a devastating hurricane had struck Galveston, Texas, the Interstate Merchants' Association of St. Louis organized a fundraising effort for the storm victims. Among the donors listed by the Republic was Adolph Daust's A. Daust Hat Co., which donated $75.

 


 

Oct. 5, the Jewish Voice announced the establishment on Sept. 29, 1900, at 1015 Selby Place of a group called the Zion Society, whose purpose was to promote Zionism by offering free lectures on Jewish and other "ancient history." The temporary leaders were identified as Joseph Halpern Scharf, M.D., chairman; J.H. Finkelstein, secretary, of 1015 Selby Place; and board of directors Ludwig Knoch and his brother, Henry, as well as Finkelstein, Dr. Scharf and M. Scharf.

 

In a separate item published Oct. 5, the Jewish Voice noted the return to St. Louis of Sam Kober, who had been vacationing with relatives in Milwaukee.

 


 

Oct. 26, the Jewish Voice announced the marriage on Oct. 21, 1900, of Leopold Kober and Mrs. Bertha Weile. The ceremony was held in the home of Rabbi H.J. Messing in the rabbi's residence, 4439 Delmar Ave., in the presence of the couple's nearest relatives. Friends and relatives were invited to visit the couple in their home, 1904 N. Grand Ave. 

 


 

1901:

 

Jan. 2, a meeting was held the previous afternoon in Reform Hall, 301 N. 12th St., to discuss allegations of corruption in the management of the James Eads How Fund by the People's Fund and Welfare Association. (How was a wealthy idealist who had established the $17,000 fund from part of his inheritance.) Louis Kober, director of the association and a representative of Central Trades and Labor Union, was elected by his socialist supporters to preside over the session. But the two factions, the socialists and the "single-taxers," were unable to lay aside their differences, and Kober, as chairman, refused to allow his opponents to speak, the Republic reported. At one point, one participant, Steve Ryan, accused Kober of being a liar. After much heated debate, the gathering finally adjourned, according to the Republic, "after the speakers had touched on everything from the ethical problems of the new century to the difference between men, cats and rats."

 


 

Jan. 5, after James Eads How made it clear that he retained control over how his charitable fund was to be used, the factions who had been so divided over its management at a New Year's Day meeting in Reform Hall agreed to bury the hatchet. Steve Ryan, a member of the "single-taxers" faction who had accused Louis Kober, leader of the socialist faction, of being a liar, apologized privately and publically, the Republic reported.

 


 

Jan. 12, despite the previous week's apparent armistice between factions of the People's Fund and Welfare Association, continued strife in the organization resulted Jan. 11 in passage of a motion, seconded by Louis Kober, leader of the socialist faction, to petition the Central Trades and Labor Union to ask them to remove Kober as their representative to the association. The resolution had been proposed by Kober's main opponent, Dr. W.H. Hill, leader of the "single-taxers," the Republic said. Hill alleged that Kober represented a faction, rather than his constituents, and that he was a "fomenter of trouble and persona non grata." Kober had seconded the motion "to go before his constituents to receive their formal approval of his action in fighting Hill."

 


 

Feb. 7, the Post-Dispatch listed Flora Kober as among the participants at a meeting of the Violet Euchre Club musicale in honor of Miss Abrahams. 

 


 

Feb. 8, the Jewish Voice noted that Flora Kober was among the guests for attending a surprise party for Sarah Abrams. 

 


 

March 22, the guests at a surprise party for Mr. S. Stahl included M. Knoch, according to the Jewish Voice. 

 


 

March 29, the family of Louis Kober was in mourning over the death of his late wife's mother, Amelia Seelig on March 24, 1901, at her son's home in Milwaukee. Other survivors included Mrs. Franklin of 1808 Hickory St. in St. Louis and Mrs. Greenstein in Alabama, the Jewish Voice noted. 

 


 

April 9, due to the continued acrimony between the socialist faction led by Louis Kober and the "single-taxer" faction led by Dr. W.H. Hill, the board of directors of the People's Fund and Welfare Association voted April 8 to suspend operations and give up its headquarters in Reform Hall effective May 1, when its lease was to expire. 

 


 

April 26, the Jewish Voice said that Sam Kober was among the June 1896 graduates of the St. Louis High School who attended a five-year reunion. 

 


 

May 31, William L. Seelig, assistant general auditor of the M.K. & T. Railroad, and his wife were reported to be in Denver to attend a railroad convention, the Jewish Voice said.

 

In the same issue of the Jewish Voice, it was reported that Harry Daust of 3534 W. Chestnut St. would be bar mitzvah on June 1 at United Hebrew Temple.

 

A separate item in the same edition of the newspaper noted that A. Daust & Co. had donated $100 and Theo. S. Marglous Hat Co. had donated $50 to the subscription for a St. Louis Jewish Hospital.

 


 

June 21, the Jewish Voice reported that Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Marglous had welcomed a son on June 5, 1901.

 


 

July 4, Adolph Daust donated $5 to the Jewish Orphan Asylum in Cleveland, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Aug. 9, the Jewish Voice belatedly reported the death of "well-known Jewish resident Arnold Knoch [Adolph Knoch]," of 1015 Selby Pl., whose funeral occurred on June 26, 1901.

 


 

Aug. 24, the wedding party for Miss Clara Joachim and Mr. Louis Meyerson on Aug. 14 included Mr. M. Rosentreter as best man, according to the Jewish Voice. Other guests included Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust and their daughter Mollie, and Mr. and Mrs. M. and D. Rosentreter and Emma Rosentreter. Rev. A. Rosentreter presided over the nuptials.

 


 

Sept. 22, near the bottom of the front page of the Republic there appeared a small story reporting that Harry Daust, son of Adolph Daust of 3534 Lawton Avenue in St. Louis, had been injured while exercising with fellow cadets in the gymnasium at the Western Military Academy in Upper Alton, Ill. Cadet Daust had tried to jump over the horizontal bars, missed the mat and fractured his arm below the elbow.   

 


 

Oct. 18, a former St. Louisan, Mrs. Sigmund Seelig of Milwaukee, was in town to visit her sons, Sam, Ike and Theo. Seelig, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Nov. 1, the Jewish Voice starts running a small display advertisment for Dr. Charles P. Grosby's dental practice.

 


 

Nov. 15, Louis Kober was among the prize winners at a Progress Club euchre and hop held in Concordia Hall on Chouteau Avenue the previous Tuesday, the Jewish Voice noted.

 


 

Nov. 29, near the bottom of the front page of the Republic there appeared a small story reporting that Harry Daust, son of Adolph Daust of 3534 Lawton Avenue in St. Louis, had been injured while exercising with fellow cadets in the gymnasium at the Western Military Academy in Upper Alton, Ill. Cadet Daust had tried to jump over the horizontal bars, missed the mat and fractured his arm below the elbow.   

 


 

Nov. 29, after socialist faction members were elected Nov. 28 in Walhalla Hall to the board of the People's Fund and Welfare Commission, Louis Kober had managed to retain control of the organization, the Republic reported. Meanwhile, James Eads How, whose charitable fund had been the subject of much debate within the organization and who now seemed fed up with the direction of the organization, told them to no longer seek out his aid.    

 


 

Dec. 20, Mrs. Adolph Daust of 3534 Lawton Ave. had recently returned from visiting relatives in Jonesboro and Hot Springs, Ark., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Dec. 27, the People's Fund and Welfare Association's leader, Louis Kober, reported Dec. 26 to the association meeting at 22 N. 4th St. that he had approached owners of the former People's Central Church at 11th and Locust Streets about possibly renting or purchasing the property. The association would provide reading material and give lectures every evening about economic issues if they secure the property, the Republic reported.    

 


 

Dec. 30, in a follow-up to their Dec. 27 article, the Republic wrote that the People's Fund and Welfare Association planned to acquire the old Union Presbyterian Church at 11th and Locust Streets if they do not incur any taxation. The association led by Louis Kober intends to use the building as a "haven of rest and comfort for the homeless," the Republic reported. No beds would be provided, and the building would close each day at 11 p.m.   

 


 

1902:

 

Jan. 2, the Republic reported that about 500 people had attended the Jan. 1 B'nai Amoona Congregation ball in Concordia Hall, 1441 Chouteau Ave. Those in attendance included Messrs. and Mmes. Moritz Maizner, Jacob Slupsky, and David Rosentreter.

 


 

Jan. 3, among the invited guests at Miss Hanna Autrichtig's New Year's Eve party were Carrie Kober, Jacob Romansky, Ludwig Knoch and Henry Knoch, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Jan. 24, among the graduates receiving diplomas on Jan. 23 from Shields School, 1119 N. 7th St., was Aaron Romansky, the Republic reported.

 


 

Jan. 24, the Jewish Voice reported that Adolph Daust was among the candidates for the board of directors of the Young Men's Hebrew Association, but the Jan. 31 issue noted that others had been elected to the board.

 

A separate item in the Jewish Voice announced the engagement of Fannie Seelig to Ben Rubin, both of Milwaukee.

 


 

Feb. 9, Adolph Daust was appointed to the Young Men's Hebrew Association's New Home Finance Committee, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Feb. 21, the Jewish Voice reported that Isidor Victor Weisskopf had been elected on Feb. 16, 1902, to the post of president of the Chess and Checker Club of the Young Men's Hebrew Association.

 


 

March 9, in a short item near the bottom of the front page of the Republic, it was reported that the People's Fund and Welfare Association, under the leadership of Louis Kober, had made a donation of $25 "to be used in caring for the thirty-five inmates of the St. Louis Colored Orphans' Home."

 


 

April 9, the Republic publicized that evening's planned lecture on "Bacteriology and [Related] Subjects" by Dr. R.H.R. Gradwohl at the Young Men's Hebrew Association, 2737 Locust St. An informal discussion was also scheduled on the Chinese Exclusion Act, which was then before Congress. The discussion was to be led by Mr. I.V. Weisskopf and another man.

 


 

April 18, the Jewish Voice reported that Flora Kober served as hostess in her Pendelton Avenue home of a meeting of the Violet euchre and social society.

 


 

April 25, Founders Day was observed April 24 at the Western Military Academy in Upper Alton, Ill. Among the 300 visitors was Mrs. Adolph Daust, whose son Harry was a cadet at the academy, the Republic noted.

 


 

May 9, Samuel Kober was among the graduates of the St. Louis High School class of 1896 who met in the St. Nicholas Hotel, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

June 13, Louis Kober announced in the Jewish Voice that he had sent out invitations to the June 15, 1902, wedding of his daughter Carrie Kober and Jacob L. Romansky in the bride's home at 1409 Pendleton Ave.

 


 

June 20, the Jewish Voice reported that Rabbi Adolf Rosentreter had united in marriage Carrie Kober and Jacob L. Romansky.

 


 

June 20, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob L. Romansky would be greeting their friends the following Sunday in their home at 1419 S. 11th St.

 


 

July 4, the Jewish Voice noted that Joseph Kober had donated $10, I.V. Weisskopf had donated $25 and Theo. Marglous had donated $25 to the Young Men's Hebrew Association.

 


 

July 12, the Missouri State Militia was inspected July 11 by the commander, Brigadier General Clark of Butler, Mo., at Camp Wells in Montesano Park, a natural springs resort south of St. Louis. The "Colonel Scouce Parade," which was a parody of a genuine parade, was held to entertain visitors. Among the participants in the parade was Sgt. Romansky, adjutant of the 2nd Battalion, the Republic said.

 


 

Aug. 29, the Jewish Voice reported the bar mitzvah of Isidor Maizner, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Maizner of 1115 Franklin Ave., would occur on Aug. 30, 1902, at B'nai Amoona, 13th and Carr Streets.

 


 

Sept. 5, the Hebrew branch of the Jefferson Club, a Democratic Party organization, met Sept. 4 to elect officers, including Jacob L. Romansky, who was elected president of the branch, the Republic reported.

 

On the same date, the Jewish Voice erroneously reported that Miss Flora Kober was the only Jewish nurse engaged at Jewish Hospital. A correction, published in the Sept. 12 Jewish Voice, said, "there have been and there are now several other Jewish nurses in the hospital."

 


 

Sept. 6, among the pharmacists planning to attend the following week's American Pharmaceutical Association convention in Philadelphia was Max Knoch, according to the Republic.

 


 

Sept. 21, the Republic reported that Christine Staaracke had sued Adolph Daust and M.G. Levinson for $4,315, alleging they had induced her to give them $2,315 the previous December by threatening to have her and her father, Louis J. Staaracke, sent to the penitentiary. The suit alleged that Daust claimed to be her father's creditor, Levinson was his attorney, and that they were accompanied, when visiting the Staaracke home in East St. Louis, Ill., by a third unknown man who was described as a federal detective. The suit seeks $2,000 in punitive damages.

 


 

Oct. 20, at the annual meeting on Oct. 19 of United Hebrew Congregation, 21st and Olive Streets, Adolph Daust was elected a member of the board of directors, the Republic noted.

 


 

Nov. 19, Louis Schwartz filed on Nov. 18 a chattel deed of trust to Adolph Daust, trustee of the A. Daust Hat Co. The loan was secured by the store's stock of men's furnishings.

 


 

Nov. 21, the United Hebrew Congregation board of directors announce plans for a meeting to approve the sale of their house of worship at the southeast corner of 21st and Olive Streets. A real estate firm, acting for unknown clients, had made an offer of $55,000 for the property. The Republic reported that the congregation was divided over the plan to sell the building. "The congregation is one of the wealthiest in the city, its members nearly all reside in the West End, and, naturally, are anxious to build a church in that part of the city," the Republic said. Adolph Daust was listed as a member of the board of directors.

 


 

Dec. 1, the People's Fund and Welfare Association met the previous afternoon to review the charity's accomplishments and plan for the coming winter's charitable work, the Republic reported. Treasurer Louis Kober reported the association had $2,263 in deposits.

 


 

Dec. 8, the Post-Dispatch announced that Samuel Kober had been elected secretary of the St. Louis Post Office Clerks' Mutual Aid Association.

 


 

Dec. 12, the Jewish Voice reported that Miss Fannie Marglous of 3032 Lucas Ave. would be visiting her uncle, Herman Sachs in Kennett, Mo., for several weeks.

 

The same issue of the Jewish Voice noted that Samuel Kober had been unanimously elected secretary of the St. Louis Post Office Clerks' Mutual Aid Association on Dec. 7.

 


 

1903:

 

Jan. 3, an article in the Republic listed appointments made at the St. Louis Circuit Court, including Jacob Romansky, who was among the deputies.

 


 

Jan. 26, the Republic and the Post-Dispatch noted that Isidor Victor Weisskopf and Adolph Daust had been elected to the board of directors of the Young Men's Hebrew Association.

 


 

Feb. 13, the Jewish Voice that Adolph Daust had been elected treasurer of the Young Men's Hebrew Association.

 


 

Feb. 15, the lead story on the front page of the Republic was headlined, "Grand Jury Indicts Marshal Barrett: An Officer of Court of Appeals Charged with Complicity in Naturalization Frauds." The Barrett referred to was Marshal Thomas E. Barrett of the St. Louis Court of Appeals. Among the 10 other people indicted by the federal grand jury was Deputy Sheriff Jacob Romansky. The investigation involved alleged large-scale fraud during the previous fall when large numbers of naturalizations were granted, mainly to Italians and Jews.

 

The case had been brought to the attention of the district attorney by the U.S. secretary of state, who had learned of an Italian man who had appealed for aid from the U.S. Consul General in Marseilles, France. The man had naturalization papers even though he had been in the U.S. for only a few weeks. This article did not report details of the charges against Romansky, but indicated that he faced two counts.

 


 

March 20, the Jewish Voice said that Adolph Daust had been named to a committee of the Young Men's Hebrew Association to investigate the important question of whether the YMHA should engage in downtown social settlement work.

 


 

March 24, the Post-Dispatch reported that postal clerks Samuel Kober and Joseph Dreyer had been discharged by St. Louis Postmaster Baumhoff after approval for the move came from First Assistant Postmaster-General Wynne.  Kober was removed apparently for "going out of his way to cause trouble for the postmaster," the Post-Dispatch said.  Kober allegedly wrote a letter to the private secretary of Arkansas Gov. Jeff Davis telling him that Samuel Seelig, who was serving a five-year sentence for stealing letters from the post office, would never have fallen if Baumhoff had paid him "living wages." The private secretary [later identified as Charles Jacobson] was a relative of Seelig and, after receiving the letter, had communicated with the post office. [Seelig may have been a cousin of Kober, whose mother's maiden surname was Seelig.]

 


 

March 25, postal clerk Samuel Kober told the Post-Dispatch that he planned to appeal his suspension and seek assistance to do so from the United States' Postal Clerk's Association. Kober denied being part of any conspiracy to make trouble for St. Louis Postmaster Baumhoff, but said that he had given evidence concerning payroll procedures to postal inspectors and Mr. Foulke, the personal representative of the president. He also told of being ordered to make the night shift difficult for women in order to get them to quit the post office.

 


 

March 29, suspended postal clerk Samuel Kober announced his temporary resignation as secretary of the St. Louis Post Office Clerks' Mutual Aid Association and as director of the United Association of Post Office Clerks. "It is indeed a most peculiar state of affairs that in this progressive age a man must suffer for telling the truth concerning another man's wrongdoing,"  he told the Post-Dispatch.

 


 

April 10, the Republic listed Samuel Kober as one of the 15 young bachelors, all graduates of the June 1896 graduation class of the St. Louis High School, who were the guests of Dr. R.B.H. Gradwohl, one of their classmates, who had married two weeks earlier. On commencement night, Gradwohl had suggested that whoever in the class married first should buy dinner for the others. The event was held in the St. Nicholas Hotel.

 


 

April 17, the Jewish Voice reported that Samuel Kober, who had served for seven years as secretary of the St. Louis High School Alumni Class of June '96, had been elected on April 9 president of the group.

 


 

April 21, more than 400 postal clerks in the St. Louis Post Office planned to request President Theodore Roosevelt to reinstate one of their colleagues, Samuel Kober, who had been` suspended from his job after testifying against St. Louis Postmaster Baumhoff in a recent investigation. The clerks, who are members of the United National Association of Post Office Clerks, passed a resolution stating that "Kober is recognized as a truthful and deserving young man, always ready to be a promoter rather than a destroyer of good service in the department," according to the article in the Republic.

 


 

April 24, the Jewish Voice reported that I.V. Weisskopf, chairman of the Young Men's Hebrew Association committee in charge of the production "The Lady of Lyons," noted that the evening had been "a most successful one from both an artistic and financial point of view."

 


 

May 8, in a small article near the bottom of the Republic front page, it was announced that a federal charter had been awarded to a new bank, Washington National Bank of St. Louis. David Rosentreter was the president, and Adolph Daust was the vice president. The bank, capitalized at $200,000, was located at 1401 Washington Ave.

 


 

May 8, the Post-Dispatch noted that Joseph Kober had donated 10 cents for a loving cup to be bestowed upon Joseph W. Folk, the reformist St. Louis prosecutor.

 


 

May 15, the Jewish Voice published a display advertisement from Washington National Bank, whose officers included David Rosentreter, president; and Adolph Daust, vice president, both of whom were on the board of directors of the new bank, 1401 Washington Ave.

 


 

May 18, at the trial of Nathan Levin on charges of aiding and counseling naturalization fraud, the Post-Dispatch reported that Levin's defense attorney planned to blame the alleged scheme on others indicted in the plot, including Deputy Sheriff Jacob Romansky, who has agreed to turn state's evidence. The scheme allegedly involved members of the Hebrew branch of the Jefferson Club, a Democratic Party organization. The indictments allege that hundreds of foreigners never went to court to get their naturalization papers, but instead obtained them from various people, particularly politicians who benefited from their votes.

 


 

May 19, Washington National Bank of St. Louis opened for business on May 18, the Republic noted. David Rosentreter, Adolph Daust and the board of directors were present to welcome new depositors.

 


 

June 5, the Jewish Voice reported that Mrs. Moritz Maizner [nee Henriette Scheye] had departed with her aunt, Mrs. Marie Knoch [nee Kober] aboard the steamship Fuerst Bismarck for Germany.

 


 

June 9, the treasurer of the People's Fund and Welfare Association, Louis Kober, planned to resolve at a special meeting of the association that they open the doors of their headquarters, at Locust and 11th Streets, from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. for the benefit of flood victims who had taken refuge in St. Louis, the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

July 29, the Post-Dispatch noted the presence of Joseph Knoch, and Israel, Rivie and Bertha Romansky, and others at party of young people at Meramec Highlands. (Two days after the Post's article, the Jewish Voice said the event included dancing, other amusements and "a dainty repast.")

 

The same issue of the Post told of another gathering at Meramec Highlands that was attended by, among others, Flora and Sam Kober, Max and Henry Knoch, Joe Seelig and Pauline Scheye.

 


 

Aug. 19, the Post-Dispatch reported the death of J.V. [Isidor Victor] Weisskopf  on Aug. 18, 1903. The cause of death was typhoid fever. Weisskopf, of Greer Avenue, was an officer of the Young Men's Hebrew Association. He had lived in St. Louis for six years but had immigrated 20 years before his death. The Aug. 20 death notice listed his survivors as his wife, Carrie Weisskopf (nee Kober); children, Irene and Philip G. Weisskopf; and siblings, Mrs. R. Beerman, Mrs. L. Reich, Mrs. E. Bilbo, Miss Fannie Weisskopf, C.W. Weisskopf and Samuel Weisskopf. (An Aug. 21, 1903, Jewish Voice obituary said he had died in Jewish Hospital at the age of 32.)

 


 

Aug. 21, the Jewish Voice that Miss Hannah Slupsky, daughter of Jacob Slupsky, had married Isaac Lenet on the previous Sunday.

 


 

Aug. 28, the board of directors of the Young Men's Hebrew Association passed a motion to postpone for 30 days "all entertainments" of the association, including the picnic planned for Sunday, Aug. 30, "as a mark of honor to the memory of their late director, I.V. Weisskopf."

 


 

Oct. 16, at a meeting of B'nai Amoona Congregation, Jacob Slupsky was elected a two-year member of the board of trustees, the Jewish Voice noted.

 


 

Nov. 6, the Jewish Voice reported that Mrs. Adolph Knoch attended the 50th anniversary celebration of Mrs. & Mrs. S. Stahl.

 


 

Nov. 13, at the top of the Republic front page was a major story headlined, "Miss Dreyer is Removed on Charge of Conspiracy; Makes Strong Statement." This was the latest development in the alleged conspiracy by a group of postal clerks to seek the removal of St. Louis Postmaster Baumhoff. The clerks, Anna Dreyer, Joseph Dreyer, Samuel Kober and Birdie Knott, had been suspended indefinitely by Baumhoff on March 9 and 10. The Nov. 13 story, datelined Washington, D.C., revealed that U.S. Postmaster General Henry C. Payne had directed Baumhoff to fire the clerks.

 

The Civil Service Commission had investigated the charges against the clerks; found that they had conspired with Baumhoff's political enemies to use false testimony to have him removed from office; and recommended the conspirators' removal to the postmaster general.

 

Miss Dreyer protested the dismissals and alleged that she had complained about Baumhoff because of his repeated improprieties toward her by which she had been "insulted, mortified and humiliated."

 


 

Nov. 13, under the headline "IS IT ANOTHER DREYFUS CASE?" a Post-Dispatch editorial criticized the firing of postal clerks, including Samuel Kober. The secrecy of the evidence that led to the postal workers' discharge was the focus of the editorial. "Has the Post Office Department adopted the methods used in the Dreyfus case by the bureaucrats of the French army? ... Why should the facts be suppressed? What is the pull that obtains the dismissal of  clerks who have made complaint concerning their superiors without opportunity to become informed of the charges against them or to answer those charges?" the editorial asked.

 


 

Nov. 13, the Jewish Voice reported that Joseph Kober would read a paper on the character of "Nathan the Wise" at the next meeting of the Young Men's Hebrew Association's Chautauqua Circle.

 


 

Nov. 15, on the previous day, a federal jury found three St. Louis men guilty of naturalization fraud, the Republic reported on their front page. Those convicted were Thomas E. Barrett, former marshal of the St. Louis Court of Appeals; John P. Dolan, chairman of the City Democratic Committee; and Frank P. Garrett, a St. Louis police officer. Among eight other men accused in the case and awaiting trial, the Republic noted, were four Romanian Jews, Joseph Fromson, Jacob Romansky, Joseph Schuman and Isidore Hyman.

 


 

Nov. 28, the Republic noted that Samuel Kober, who had been fired for allegedly conspiring with other postal clerks to have the St. Louis postmaster removed from office, had written a letter to the Civil Service Commission seeking a rehearing of his case. In addition, the Republic reported that the National Association of Postal Clerks had been informed of the case and was taking steps on Kober's behalf.

 


 

Dec. 1, the Post-Dispatch reported that the Civil Service Commission had refused to overturn the firing of postal clerk Samuel Kober.

 


 

Dec. 2, a Post-Dispatch editorial slammed the Civil Service Commission's refusal to reconsider Samuel Kober's firing, characterizing the commission's action as an evasion of long-established presidential orders. "The Civil Service Commission was constituted to protect the civil service from the demoralization produced by the exercise of arbitrary power of [the] removing officers. And the law clothes the commission with power to effect this purpose, not in some, but in all cases," the editorial declared.

 


 

Dec. 6, the Post-Dispatch noted that Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig Knoch attended a party for Mrs. A. Goldstein in honor of her anniversary.

 


 

1904:

 

Jan. 5, on New Year's Eve, the B'nai Amoona Young People's Aid Society had held at "watch party" in a member's home, the Republic said. Among the 16 young people present was Joseph Knoch.

 


 

Jan. 13, the Washington National Bank of St. Louis board of directors was re-elected on Jan. 12, including David Rosentreter and Adolph Daust.

 


 

Jan. 22, the federal grand jury was meeting this week, the Republic reported, to hear evidence concerning alleged naturalization fraud. Among those already indicted and awaiting trial was Jacob Romansky, a deputy sheriff, who was president of the Hebrew Jefferson Club for one day, the Republic noted. He was expected to be called before the grand jury.

 


 

Feb. 19, the Jewish Voice noted that Flora Kober and her brother Arthur were among the guests at a Valentine party in the home of their friend Miss Annie Brenner of 4066 Page Blvd.

 


 

Feb. 26, Mrs. Jacob Romansky won a prize at a meeting of the S.O.P euchre club in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Cohn, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

March 24, the engagement of Eva Kory, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. Kory of 1119 Morrison Ave., to Max Knoch was noted in the Republic.

 


 

March 25, the Jewish Voice reported that Leon Marglous, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Marglous, would have his bar mitzvah the following Saturday morning in United Hebrew Temple, Kingshighway and Morgan Street.

 


 

May 6, about 100 friends and relatives attended the marriage ceremony of Max Knoch and Eva Kory that was performed in the Young Men's Hebrew Association Home the previous Tuesday. Rabbis Messing and Rosentreter presided. the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

May 13, Louis Kober was reported in the Jewish Voice to be gravely ill with pneumonia in Alexian Brothers' Hospital. His daughter, Flora, a nurse at Jewish Hospital, and son, Sam, were constantly at his bedside. Mr. Kober was identified as a charter member of the Ibn Ezra Lodge, I.O.B.B. (Independent Order B'nai B'rith). One week later, the Voice reported that Louis' condition was improving, although he was still in the hospital.

 


 

May 27, the Jewish Voice noted that Flora Kober was among the alumni of the Cleveland Orphan Asylum who attended a surprise party for Dr. J.J. Singer, one of their classmates at the asylum, who had just graduated from Washington University. Flora contributed to the cost of a new roller top desk that was presented to the guest of honor.

 


 

June 15, Monroe School graduates listed in the Republic included Martin Daust. On June 24, the Jewish Voice noted that Martin, who had graduated on June 16, would attend McKinley High School.

 


 

Sept. 15, the Jewish Voice wrote that Mr. and Mrs. Abe Slupsky had as their guest Miss Carrie Scheye of Denver, Colo.

 


 

Oct. 7, Mrs. I.V. Weisskopf of 4462 Greer Ave. hosted a party in honor of three out-of-town women, Miss Sarah Levi of Syracuse, N.Y.; Miss Carrie Scheye of Denver; and Miss Rose Kohner of Libertyville, Ill. Among those present, the Jewish Voice said, were Mesdames Oscar Greenwald, Henry Kohner, Marie Knoch, Joseph Seligman, Morris Kohner, M. Kory, Max Knoch, Conrad Cohnheim, Abe Slupsky, Ludwig Knoch, Leo Dzialowsky and the Misses Alice Rosenberg, Frieda Posnansky, Dora Cohnheim, Nellie Kory and Beckie Posnansky.

 


 

Oct. 25, the Republic published a brief notice that Bertha Romansky of 1512 Wash St., sister of Deputy Sheriff Jacob Romansky, that evening was to marry Dr. Charles P. Gorsby [Grosby], a dentist of 1119 Franklin Ave.

 


 

1905:

 

April 20, according to a brief note in the Jewish Voice, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust and their daughters, Mollie and Fannie, were leaving the following Saturday for an extended European trip. "A large circle of friends bid them a bon voyage and a safe and happy return," the Voice said.

 


 

May 12, the Jewish Voice noted that Mrs. Adolph Daust donated clothing to the United Jewish Charities.

 

In the same issue of the Voice, a resolution signed by directors of the B'nai Amoona congregation, including Jacob Slupsky, expressed appreciation for 20 years of service by their rabbi, Adolph Rosentreter, who was leaving the congregation to join Washington National Bank.

 


 

April, the Post-Dispatch ran display ads for Washington National Bank, a new financial institution at 14th Street and Washington Avenue in downtown St. Louis. Several members of B'nai Amoona Congregation, including Adolph Daust, David Rosentreter, and Adolph Rosentreter, were among the bank's officials. Daust, a wholesale hat dealer and real estate speculator, was identified in the ad as vice president and capitalist. Adolph Rosentreter was the assistant cashier and saving department manager. David Rosentreter was president of the board of directors.

 


 

July 21, the Jewish Voice noted that Mrs. Salo Daust and her daughter Martha had left the previous Tuesday for Memphis.

 


 

Aug. 4, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Slupsky and their two younger daughters were visiting New York City, the Jewish Voice reported.

 

The same newspaper noted that Mrs. S. Kober had returned from a yearlong stay in Butte, Mont., and would be accepting visitors in her St. Louis home, 2810 Gamble St., after Aug. 15.

 


 

Aug. 18, Mrs. S. Daust of Meramec Street had departed the previous Sunday for a visit to Kimmswick, Mo., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Sept. 1, during a visit to Europe, the Jewish Voice reported, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust and their daughters, Mollie and Fannie, had to be put their plans on hold when Mrs. Daust required serious surgery that kept her in bed for four weeks. Since her recovery, the family was planning to leave Berlin on Aug. 17 for Pyrmont, Waldeck, Germany, and to sail for the U.S. on Sept. 9 aboard the steamer Graf Waldersee.

 


 

Oct. 27, Mr. and Mrs. A. Daust and their children were reported in the Jewish Voice to have returned to St. Louis after visiting Europe for five months. Their new home was at 4158a McPherson Ave.

 


 

Nov. 3, the Jewish Voice noted that Miss Fannie Marglous and her brother, Mr. Mayer Marglous, of 3032 Lucas Ave., were visiting their aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Marglous of Mascoutah, Ill.

 


 

1906:

 

Jan. 19, Samuel Kober and his brother, Arthur, were among the new members to be initiated on Jan. 21, 1906, into the Missouri Lodge, No. 22, of the I.O.B.B. (Independent Order B'nai B'rith), the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

March 6, an afternoon entertainment in honor of Mrs. Sol. Kirschbaum of Kansas City was hosted by Mrs. I.V. Weisskopf, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

March 24, involuntary bankruptcy proceedings had been filed against David Rosentreter, former president of the Washington National Bank, the Post-Dispatch reported. Rosentreter was accused of transferring property to other creditors, according to the filing. The creditor with the largest interest in the bank, amounting to $60,000, was identified as Adolph Daust, a former bank director who had left the bank in 1905, according to a bank spokesman. Rosentreter had not been connected with the bank for six months.


 

May 21, under the headline "BREAD FAMINE IS THREATENING GHETTO; RESULT OF A STRIKE," the Post-Dispatch reported that 40 bakers had gone on strike at 15 Kosher bakeries in the area bounded by 15th and 7th Streets and Carr and Biddle Streets. Among the affected bakeries was the one owned by Joseph Romansky of 15th and Wash Streets. The striking bakers alleged they had been forced to work 24 hours straight from noon Thursday to noon Friday in order to supply the demands of the Jewish Sabbath. Twelve of the 15 bakeries said they were willing to negotiate with the strikers, but three of them, including Romansky, were refusing to recognize a union.

 


 

July 20, Rosa Cronheim, Nettie Reicenstein and Flora Kober returned recently from a two-week visit to Cleveland, where they attended the annual graduation exercises of their alma mater, the Jewish Orphan Asylum, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Aug. 3, Joseph Knoch played center field for the B'nai Amoona baseball team in a game against the B'nai El team, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Aug. 10, Miss Clara Kohner of 3941 Kennerly Ave. had left for a month-long visit with relatives in Chicago and Libertyville, Ill., and Milwaukee, the Jewish Voice said.

 

In the same issue, it was reported that Fannie Marglous and her brother, Meyer, of 3032 Lucas Ave. were visiting Mr. and Mrs. A. Marglous in Mascoutah, Ill.

 


 

Sept. 14, the Jewish Voice reported that M. Maizner was serving on the B'nai Amoona building committee and was secretary of the cemetery board.

 


 

Oct. 5, to correspond with the B'nai Brith convention taking place in St. Louis, the Jewish Voice published a series of historical documents concerning the early years of the Missouri Lodge, No. 22, I.O.B.B. (Independent Order B'nai B'rith). M. Fischer was among the members, having joined on May 17, 1878, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Nov. 11, the Post-Dispatch reported that Louis Kober, Socialist candidate for railroad and warehouse commissioner, had received 138 votes, placing him in third place among four candidates. The Republican won, the Democrat came in second, and the Prohibitionist came in fourth.

 


 

Nov. 16, according to the Jewish Voice, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Rockling (nee Ida Kohner) were living at 3737 Palm St.

 


 

1907:

 

April 5, the Jewish Voice reported that Mrs. M. Arnold had announced the engagement of her daughter, Myra, to Samuel Kober.

 


 

June 12, Max Knoch, 33, a pharmacist, died on June 10 in the home of his wife's parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. Kory, 1119 Morrison Ave., the Jewish Voice reported. The young couple had been married for three years. The cause of death had been diabetes.

 


 

Aug. 2, among the participants in a July 23 trolley ride given by the "Bunch" along the Meramec river were Dr. and Mrs. Charles P. Grosby, as chaperones; Rinie Romansky, Israel Romansky, and others, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Sept. 27, a Jewish Voice article about the Orthodox Home officers said that M. Maizner was a board member and chairman of the auditing committee.

 


 

Oct. 18, Jacob Slupsky was a member of B'nai Amoona's board of directors, and M. Maizner was secretary of the cemetery committee, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Dec. 2, in a Post-Dispatch article, Abe Slupsky explained that he was setting aside the Jewish tradition of naming children for deceased relatives. He had decided to name his new son Amedee Cole Slupsky in honor of his friend Amedee B. Cole, treasurer of the St. Louis Republican Central Committee. "It is my philosophy that if you want to benefit a man, do it while he is living. For, please, dead men need no friends," he told the newspaper. Mrs. Ludwig Knoch was godmother, and Cole was godfather.

 


 

Dec. 28, Israel Romansky donated $25 to the Christmas Festival Fund, the Post-Dispatch reported.

 


 

1908:

 

Jan. 10, on New Year's Eve, Miss Clara Kohner of Kennerly Avenue held a party in honor of her cousin Miss Florence Schlesinger of Collinsville, Ill., the Jewish Voice said. Other participants included Misses Flora and Effie Kohner and Mr. A. Kohner.

 


 

Jan. 25, the engagement of Martha Daust of 3222 Meramec St. to Henry Fischer was announced by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Salo Daust, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

March 6, Mrs. Sam Kober (nee Myra Arnold) participated in the Disraeli Whist Club's 18th Century whist and luncheon on Washington's Birthday, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

April 10, the marriage of Rose Slupsky, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Slupsky, to Louis Levin took place in the bride's parents' home, 5307 Waterman Avenue, the Jewish Voice noted. The bride's sister, Blanche, was maid of honor.

 


 

May 8, the wedding of Miss Martha Daust and Mr. Henry Fischer took place on April 28 at Rebman's, a caterer, the Jewish Voice reported. Among those attending were Bianca Daust, the bride's sister, as bridesmaid; Joseph Knoch, the groom's first cousin, as best man; Martin Daust, the bride's brother, as usher; and Ludwig Knoch, the groom's first cousin, as toastmaster. "Among those present were Messrs. and Mesdames S. [Salo] Daust [the bride's father], Abe Slupsky [the groom's brother-in-law], Ludwig Knoch [groom's first cousin], Sam Kober [groom's first cousin], M. Maizner [husband of groom's first cousin], M. Gelefsky, Max Gans, Finkelstein, C. Vincent and Marglous [former business partner of bride's uncle Adolph Daust]; Mesdames E. Fisher [Fischer, the groom's mother], Weiskopf [Weisskopf], Knoch, Romansky and Rosenstein; Misses Bianca Daust [bride's sister] and Marglous; and Messrs. Martin Daust [bride's brother], Leopold, Joseph and Louis Kober [previous three, groom's uncle, cousin and uncle, respectively], Joseph Knoch [groom's first cousin], Baumgartner and many others."

 


 

May 15, among the participants at the B'nai Amoona Young People's Aid Society's tenth annual outing at Normandy Grove were Mr. Israel Romansky, Miss Rina Romansky, and Mrs. Israel Romansky, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

June 19, the fifth wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig J. Knoch was to be marked the evening of June 25 in the couple's home, 3826 Kennerly Ave., where they were to welcome guests from 7 to 10 p.m., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Sept. 4, the engagement of Fannye Rose Marglous, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Marglous, to Paul Roberts of Festus, Mo., was announced in the Jewish Voice.

 


 

1909:

 

April 4, a Jewish Voice article reported that Morris Slupsky had participated in the closing exercises of Shaare Emeth's Sunday school.

 


 

July 30, Clara Kohner, daughter of Henry Kohner, was married the previous Tuesday to Harry Hyman, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Aug. 13, the Jewish Voice reported that Mrs. I.V. Weisskopf of 4462 Greer Ave. was playing host for a few days to Samuel Weisskopf, who was en route to his home in San Francisco. Mrs. Weisskopf was also being visited by her cousin Miss Dora Cohnheim of Kansas City, formerly of St. Louis.

 


 

Oct. 7, M. Maizner was identified as secretary of the B'nai Amoona Congregation, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

1910:

 

March 25, Mr. and Mrs. Knoch were among the guests at a surprise party for Mrs. Nathan Meyer of 4322 Delmar Ave., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

May 20, the Jewish Voice reported that Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter had announced that his daughter, Emmy [Amy], would wed Joseph Knoch.

 


 

June 10, Mr. Salo Daust of 3222 Meramac St. left St. Louis the previous Tuesday for San Antonio, Texas, to spend two weeks with his son, Martin Daust,  the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

June 19, the Post-Dispatch noted that Blanche Slupsky, niece of Abe Slupsky and daughter of Jacob Slupsky, would wed Nathan Cohen on June 21.

 


 

July 15, in the Jewish Voice, Rabbi Adolph Rosentreter issued an open invitation for members of the B'nai Amoona Congregation, which he served, and all of his friends outside the synagogue, to attend the July 17 reception from 5 to 11 p.m. at 4322 Delmar Ave. for the wedding of his daughter Emmy [Amy] Rosentreter, to Joseph Knoch.

 


 

July 29, the Jewish Voice noted that Miss Marian Epstein of Kansas City, formerly of St. Louis, was visiting her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig J. Knoch of Clara Avenue.

 


 

Aug. 12, Mrs. Salo Daust of 3222 Meramec Ave. was spending a month visiting the Montebella Farm in Kimmswick, Mo., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Oct. 21, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Knoch were reported to have moved into their new home, 1368 Clara Ave., where they were welcoming visitors, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Oct. 28, a Jewish Voice item about B'nai Amoona Congregation's officers noted that M. Maizner was secretary of the cemetery committee.

 


 

Nov. 4, the editor of the Jewish Voice, Rabbi Moritz Spitzer, published a tribute to Louis Kober, who had died Oct. 30, 1910, at the age of 69. Spitzer, who was serving B'nai El Congregation at the time, wrote: "And so Louis Kober, one of St. Louis' unique and picturesque Jewish pioneers has gone to his eternal reward. We admit, we were deeply affected by the news of his death whom we had known, particularly through his B'nai Brith membership in 'Eban Ezra' Lodge, for more than thirty years. His characteristic trait was an unbending, unyielding adherence to his principles, and you could not help honoring in him the man and the citizen. He walked through life in humble circumstances, yet in him there was much of the leader and the prophet. We extend our sympathy to his children, who certainly inherit the good name of their father. His funeral was yesterday afternoon to 'Sheareth Israel' [New Mt. Sinai] cemetery. He was 70 years old, less two months. He leaves two sons [Samuel and Arthur] and two daughters [Flora Kober and Carrie Kober Romansky]."

 


 

Dec. 2, the Jewish Voice wrote that Flora Kohner would marry Chas. Miller Jr. of Ft. Smith, Ark, formerly of St. Louis, on Jan. 1. The ceremony would take place at 4322 Easton Ave., the home of her parents.

 


 

Dec. 16, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kohner (nee Newman) of 2716 Allen Ave. became the parents of a boy the previous Tuesday, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

1911:

 

Jan. 13, a Jewish Voice article about the Jewish Orthodox Old Home reported that Sol. Maizner was a member of the committee examining the home's financial records.

 


 

Feb. 10, in the social column of the Jewish Voice, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Marglous on the previous Sunday had accepted visits from friends in their  home, 3032 Lucas Ave., to celebrate their daughter Ruth's graduation from Pope School and their son Moe's bar mitzvah, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Feb. 17, Mrs. Kober of 5270 Page Ave. was among the donors of used clothing to the United Jewish Educational Association, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

March 1, the Post-Dispatch published the death notice of Salo Daust, who had died Feb. 28, 1911, at age 63 years and 10 months. He was survived by his wife, Jeanette Daust (nee Foerder); and his children, Mrs. Martha Fischer and Bianca and Martin Daust.

 


 

March 3, the Jewish Voice marked Salo Daust's death, characterizing him as follows: "The departed one was a faithful Jew, having been a member of the B'nai Amoona Congregation." The list of survivors said, "Mrs. Henry Fischer of 7209 S. Broadway and Miss Bianka Daust are the daughters, and the son, Martin Daust, married, resides in San Antonio, Tex." The burial was at the Shearith Israel Cemetery, with Rabbi A. Rosentreter officiating. [The reference to Martin being married has not been confirmed. Both the 1910 census and his 1915 death certificate indicate that he was single.]

 

A separate item in the March 3 Jewish Voice reported that Sol Maizner had been elected treasurer of the Pride of St. Louis Lodge, No. 205, Progressive Order of the West.

 


 

March 10, Mrs. Emmy Rosenteter Knoch had entertained in honor of Miss Marian Epstein of Kansas City, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

March 17, Sol Maizner donated two boxes of cigars to the Orthodox Home for Aged Jews, reported the Jewish Voice.

 


 

March 19, a death notice for Moritz Maizner, who died March 17, 1911, appeared in the Post-Dispatch. He was survived by his widow, Henrietta Maizner (nee Scheye) and his sons, Isadore and Solomon Maizner.

 


 

March 19, Morris Marglous donated $2 in memory of his mother to the Jewish Voice's Shoe Fund.

 


 

March 24, the Jewish Voice asserted that "Perhaps the largest funeral ever witnessed in the B'nai Amoona [Congregation] was that of Moritz Maizner," who had died on March 18, 1911, at home after a long illness. "The tremendously large attendance was a testimony to his worth as a Jew, as a neighbor and as a worker in every good cause. May his soul rest in peace," the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

May 19, Mrs. Theo. Marglous and Mrs. Sam Kober were among the guests at a "miscellaneous shower" for Miss Aline Silverberg, who was engaged to Mr. Ben Kastor of Hugo, Okla., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

June 9, the Jewish Voice announced that Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust, who had been living in Berlin, Germany, for the last five years, were visiting St. Louis. They were staying temporarily with Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous. [Adolph Daust and Abraham J. Marglous were married to sisters.]

 


 

Aug. 4, Theo. Marglous was among the guests at a surprise birthday party for Augusta Lippman, 4539 Page Ave., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Oct. 27, a Jewish Voice article reported that Sol. Maizner was secretary of B'nai Amoona's Shearith Israel Cemetery Board.

 


 

Dec. 8, Helen and Ruth Marglous attended a surprise party for Carrie Prusanski, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

1912:

 

Jan. 5, a surprise party for Ruth Marglous of 3032 Lucas Ave. had been hosted by Carrie Prusansky of 4217 Washington Ave., the Jewish Voice said. Gertie and Leon Marglous and several other young people had attended.

 


 

Jan. 12, the Jewish Voice reported that Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Knoch (nee Emmy Rosentreter) were the parents of a baby girl [Mercedes Knoch] born on Jan. 3, 1912.

 

The same edition of the newspaper also noted that Mrs. Harry Schwartzberg of 3949 McPherson Ave. had entertained in honor of a recent bride, Mrs. Jake Cohen (nee Rina Romansky).

 

A separate item in the Jewish Voice announced that the Phi Beta Gamma Fraternity was planning an informal dance for Valentine's night in Clendenen's Academy. Dr. Abe Romansky was among the fraternity members.

 

Another Jan. 12 notice mentioned that Mr. Henry Kohner of 4322 Easton Ave. would represent the Judah Touro Lodge at the Free Sons convention in Chicago. He was also planning to visit his children in Milwaukee and, on the return trip, to stop in Danville, Ill., to visit his brothers and sisters, Messrs. and Mesdames Zepin and Meyer.

 


 

Feb. 2, the president's annual report of the St. Louis Jewish Educational and Charitable Association published in the Jewish Voice said that Dr. Max Goldstein had reported that Miss [Flora] Kober, the visiting nurse, had made a total of 1,934 calls attending various patients.

 


 

Feb. 9, the Jewish Voice described a "ground hog" surprise birthday party held for Miss Helen Marglous. The host was Miss Rebecca Whiser. Guests included Misses Frieda Rosentreter, Gertrude Marglous, and Ruth Marglous; Mrs. D. Marglous; and Messrs. Meyer Marglous, A. J. Marglous, Moe Marglous and several others.

 


 

May 10, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Daust were reported to be visiting her relatives, Mr. and Mrs. H. Sachs in Kennett, Mo., after which the Dausts were to sail home to Charlottenburg, Germany, the Jewish Voice said. The Dausts "are exceedingly sorry not having been able to bid a personal adieu to every one of their many friends, who have the assurance of the heartiest welcome, should they ever call on Mr. and Mrs. Daust on the other side of the ocean," the newspaper said.

 


 

May 31, the Jewish Voice reported that Mrs. Maizner was a member of the board of trustees of the Orthodox Old Home.

 

In the same edition of the Jewish Voice, it was noted that Mr. Moritz Maizner had donated $25 to the Orthodox Old Home.

 


 

July 12, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Knoch have moved from 1368 Clara Ave. to their new home, 5112 Kensington Ave., the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Aug. 16, Mr. and Mrs. [Henry] Fischer of Carondelet are the parents of a new son [Morris], the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Oct. 4, the Jewish Voice announced the bar mitzvah of Irving Dzialowski [Erwin Field], son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Dzialowski. The Saturday morning ceremony was to take place at B'nai Amoona Synagogue, Garrison and Lucas Avenues.

 


 

Oct. 4, Abraham J. Marglous was elected a B'nai Amoona Congregation trustee, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

1913:

 

April 4, the Jewish Voice said that Theo. Marglous had performed a solo in the Ben Akiba Minstrels show.

 


 

May 9, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Marglous and family were moving on May 15, 1913, from 4448 Evans Ave. to 5075 Von Versen Ave.

 


 

Aug. 1, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kober and Mrs. M. Arnold, of 4315 W. Belle Place, accompanied by Mrs. Nettie A. Levy, of 5845a Von Versen Ave., had left on a weeks long vacation to Denver, Colorado Springs, Manitou and other Western points, the Jewish Voice said. 

 


 

Sept. 9, the Jewish Voice said that Joseph Knoch had left on a trip to the East to join his wife, who had been traveling for the previous three weeks. They were to return to St. Louis the following Tuesday after stopping in Atlantic City and elsewhere.

 


 

Oct. 2, Mr. Isadore Maizner was engaged to Charlotta Ginsburg, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. A. Ginsburg of Arlington Avenue, the Jewish Voice announced.

 


 

Oct. 24, a Post-Dispatch list of marriage licenses revealed that Max Ludwig's widow, Mrs. Eva Kory Knoch, was to marry Solomon Bornstein.

 


 

Oct. 31, S. Maizner was identified as the assistant superintendent of the cemetery board of B'nai Amoona Congregation, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Nov. 7, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Marglous of 3032 Lucas Ave. were moving to 5401 Cabanne Ave.

 


 

1914:

 

Jan. 23, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Marglous had sent out invitations to a dinner dance in honor of their daughters Misses Helen and Ruth in their home at 5401 Cabanne Ave., the Jewish Voice said.

 

The same issue of the Jewish Voice noted that a surprise shower had been given by Mrs. L. Pearlstone of Arlington Avenue for Miss Charlotta Ginsburg, who was engaged to Mr. Isadore Maizner.

 


 

Feb. 13, the Jewish Voice noted that Rabbi Rosentreter had united in marriage the previous Sunday night, Feb. 8, 1913, Miss Charlotta Ginsburg of 1382 Arlington Ave. and Mr. Isidore Maizner.

 


 

Feb. 27, Theo. Marglous was among the guests at a novelty Washington party held by the Emanon club in the home of Miss Esther Schwartz, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

March 6, the Jewish Voice noted that Dr. and Mrs. C. Grosby of 5166 Kensington Ave. were the parents of a new daughter [Helen Grosby].

 


 

March 13, the new Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Maizner of 1371 Clara Ave. were now "at home to their friends," the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

May 1, the owner of property across the street from B'nai Amoona Congregation's cemetery filed a lawsuit seeking $30,000 in damages from the Sherith Israel Cemetery Association and 10 members of the congregation, including A.J. Marglous, Jacob Slupsky and Solomon Maizner. The plaintiff, Julius Laughlin, an attorney, alleges the cemetery had reduced the value of his property by conducting fake funerals and burying caskets filled with earth to escape taxation on 14 acres of land, the Post-Dispatch reported. Maizner, the cemetery's assistant superintendent, denied the allegations.

 


 

May 3, in a follow up to the May 1 Post-Dispatch story, the newspaper reported further denials by cemetery officials about the allegations in the lawsuit filed against them. Herman Maizner, sexton of B'nai Amoona Congregation, scheduled a congregational meeting for May 3 to express indignation about the allegations and to issue a formal denial. Benjamin Burenstein, president of the cemetery association, told a Post-Dispatch reporter, "You may say for me and others here that the allegation made by Laughlin about the burial of earth-filled coffins to escape taxation is a contemptible lie. ... The filing of such a suit is a gross insult and will be vigorously contested."

 


 

May 8, the Jewish Voice commented on the lawsuit against the Sherith Israel Cemetery Association, saying, "The association held a largely attended meeting last Sunday and are now ready to defend themselves against these allegations, which, we are perfectly satisfied, cannot be proven."

 


 

Aug. 7, Miss Ruth Marglous had left for a few weeks to visit a friend in Chicago, Miss Helen Katzen of Michigan Avenue, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Sept. 18, among the New Year's greeting ads published in the Jewish Voice were ones from Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Maizner of 1371 Clara Ave. and Mrs. Henrietta Maizner and her son, Sol Maizner, of 1115 Franklin Ave.

 


 

Oct. 5, in a story about the Franklin Avenue Improvement Association's Perfect Baby Contest, the Post-Dispatch reported that Louis Romansky of 4235 Page Blvd. won a yellow (third place) ribbon. The contest was based on physical merits as judged by doctors and nurses.

 


 

Oct. 9, the Jewish Voice listed Abraham J. Marglous and family as having donated $27 to the B'nai Amoona Palestine Fund. H. Maizner and S. Maizner each donated $1.

 


 

Oct. 13, the Jewish Voice noted that friends and members of the Emanon club had held a farewell party for Mr. Theodore Marglous of 5075 Von Versen Ave. prior to his departure for Mascoutah, Ill., where he had established a business.

 


 

Oct. 16, Henry Knoch donated $10 to the B'nai Amoona Palestine Fund, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

1915:

 

Jan. 1, Mrs. I. Romansky had been elected vice president of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Jan. 8, the Jewish Voice noted that Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Maizner of Clara Avenue were the parents of a baby girl [Roslynd Maizner] who was born on Jan. 4, 1915.

 

In a separate item, the Jewish Voice said that Mrs. M. Knoch was among the guests at a surprise party for Mrs. M. Golland.

 


 

Jan. 15, the Jewish Voice said J. Romansky donated $12 to the Jewish Sufferers in the War Zone Fund of the American Jewish Relief Committee.

 

The same issue of the Jewish Voice said that Mrs. Myra Kober had been elected organist for the St. Louis Chapter, No. 357, Order of Eastern Star.

 


 

March 26, the Jewish Voice published the following item: "Miss Florence Kober, one of our thorough and conscientious as well as able Jewish nurses, has been called to the front by the Red Cross Society and leaves in a week or ten days for Belgium. A large local following wish her well."

 


 

April 2, according to the Jewish Voice, donors to the Young Men's and Ladies' Hebrew Charity Society's Mo-oas Chitim Fund included: A. J. Marglous, $3; Harris & Kober, $2; Mrs. H. Maizner, $.50; and Herman Maizner, $.50.

 


 

May 20, the Jewish Voice noted the death on May 12, 1915, at age 26 of Martin Daust of 3222 Meramec St. He was survived by his mother, Mrs. Jeannette Daust, and his sisters, Mrs. Martha Fischer and Miss Bianca Daust.

 


 

June 6, a Post-Dispatch list of marriage licenses revealed that Aaron Romansky was to marry Mollie Goldstein.

 


 

July 16, the Jewish Voice said that Mrs. M. Maizner, accompanied by her daughter [-in-law], Mrs. I. Maizner, had left on Monday for Mt. Clemens, Mich., and they would be gone for about a month.

 


 

Aug. 20, the Jewish Voice noted the return to St. Louis of Mrs. M. Maizner; her daughter [-in-law], Mrs. I. Maizner; and the latter's little daughter from their stay in Mt. Clemons, Mich.

 


 

Sept. 10, among the New Year's greeting ads published in the Jewish Voice were ones from Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Maizner of of 1236a Blackstone Ave., Mrs. Henrietta Maizner of 1236a Blackstone Ave. and Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Marglous of 5075 Von Versen Ave.

 


 

Oct. 8, a Jewish Voice report on the B'nai Amoona Congregation's annual meeting said that Abraham J. Marglous was the cemetery committee's treasurer. The same report noted the death in the previous year of synagogue member Martin Daust.

 


 

Nov. 12, Joseph Romansky donated $5 and collected donations from others for the St. Louis Relief Committee of the Jewish War Sufferers, the Jewish Voice reported. He donated another $7 the following week.

 


 

Nov. 19, the Jewish Voice reported that Mrs. M. Maizner and M. Knoch were among the guests at Mr. and Mrs. Simon Rosenberg's 10th anniversary party.

 


 

1916:

 

April 7, the Jewish Voice reported that Mrs. Henriette Daust, nee Sachs, wife of Adolf Daust had died March 5, 1917, in Berlin. She was also survived by her children, Mrs. Mollie Tischler, wife of Dr. Max Tischler; Mrs. Fannie Presch and Mr. Herbert Daust, all of Berlin. Mrs. Daust's surviving siblings were Mrs. A.J. Marglous of St. Louis, Louis Sachs of Jonesboro, Ark., and Herman Sachs of Kennett, Mo.

 


 

April 21, the Jewish Voice reported the marriage on the previous Sunday of Mr. Sol. Maizner and Miss Gertrude Geist of 3655 Flad Ave.

 


 

April 28, Mrs. A.J. Marglous donated $5 to the Orthodox Old Home, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

May 19, L. Kober was among the alternates from the Missouri Lodge, IOBB, to the B'nai Brith Convention in Cleveland scheduled for the following week, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

June 2, among the Shaare Emeth Temple children about to be confirmed, the Jewish Voice said, was Irene Weisskopf of 4462 Greer Ave.

 


 

June 9, Dr. A. Romansky pledged $25 to the Young Men's Hebrew Association, the Jewish Voice said.

 

In a separate item, the Jewish Voice noted that among the donors to buy a new site for B'nai Amoona Congregation were A.J. Marglous, $50; and H. Maizner, $10.

 


 

July 7, the Jewish Voice praised Miss Flora Kober, matron of the Jewish Shelter Home, for a successful 4th of July entertainment for her young wards. "The little ones looked clean, cute and trim," the newspaper said. "Their recitations, singing and dancing elicited well-earned applause, but surely, the greatest part of the applause belonged to Miss Kober, whose labors for those poor little ones merit full approval." After the program, the children were treated to dinner and ice cream and cake provided by the Akiba Lodge.

 


 

July 21, Mrs. Henrietta Maizner and her daughter-in-law Mrs. Isidore Maizner and babe were reported by the Jewish Voice to be spending a few weeks in Okawville, Ill.

 


 

Aug. 25, A.J. Marglous donated $5 to the Orthodox Old Folks Home, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Oct. 4, the Post-Dispatch reported that during the Veiled Prophet Parade, 11 St. Louis homes were burglarized, including that of Leopold Kober of 4594 Evans Ave.

 


 

Oct. 22, Mrs. Henrietta Maizner, widow of Moritz Maizner, was killed at 6:50 p.m., Oct. 21, 1916, at Page Boulevard and Montclair Avenue when she was struck by a car driven by Dr. Clarence Martin, the Post-Dispatch reported. After the accident, Dr. Martin and another motorist picked her up and transported her to St. Luke's Hospital, where she was pronounced dead. She was initially identified by a bank book in her pocket, which also contained diamonds estimated by police to be worth $2,000. Her son Isadore Maizner confirmed the identification and explained that his mother had been visiting a relative in South St. Louis and apparently left a street car only minutes before the accident. Dr. Martin was arrested and later released on $1,000 bond.

 

The Jewish Voice of Oct. 27, reported that Mrs. Maizner had lived with her son Isadore at 1339 Montclair Ave. She was survived by another son, Sol Maizner; a sister, Mrs. Leo Dzialowski; and a brother, Max Shey[e] of Denver, Colo.

 


 

Oct. 27, Mrs. H. Maizner and Meyer Maizner each gave $5 to the Jewish War Sufferers Fund, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Dec. 8, Miss Flora Kober, matron of the Jewish Shelter Home in St. Louis, was among the members of the Cleveland Jewish Orphan Asylum Alumni listed by the Jewish Voice as likely to attend the 75th birthday celebration of Dr. S. Wolfenstein, director of the asylum. Nevertheless, the follow-up article a week later did not indicate that she had attended the event at a Cleveland hotel.

 


 

Dec. 22, a donation of $10 to the Orthodox Old Home was received from Sol and Isadore Maizner in memory of their mother, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Dec. 29, the Jewish Voice said that Leo Dzialowski donate $2 and whiskey to the Jewish Orthodox Old Home.

 


 

1917:

 

Jan. 5, Miss Florence Kober, matron of the Jewish Shelter Home, was "particularly happy" with the children's performance of "A Thanksgiving Dream" the previous Saturday, the Jewish Voice noted. The home, which provided temporary housing for children, was located at 2236 Tower Grove Ave. in St. Louis.

 


 

Jan. 12, the Jewish Voice said that Joseph Romanski donate $5 to the Jewish Orthodox Old Home.

 


 

Feb. 16, Mrs. Morris Marglous gave $2 to the Jewish Voice's Shoe Fund in memory of her mother.

 


 

March 16, Miss Florence Kober, matron of the Jewish Shelter Home, issued a request, through the Jewish Voice, for the donation of an encyclopedia for the home for destitute children.

 


 

April 20, among the guests at a seder for children of the Jewish Shelter Home were Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Kober, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

May 11, Miss Florence Kober, matron of the Jewish Shelter Home, "has been compelled to resign her position as superintendent of the Shelter Home, and depart with the Red Cross Unit at Barnes Hospital, where it embarks for work in France," the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

May 18, among the children in the confirmation class from Shaare Emeth Congregation was Philip Weisskopf, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

May 25, the Jewish Voice reported the death on May 21, 1917, at age 16 of Irene B. Weisskopf, daughter of Mrs. Carrie Kober Weisskopf and sister of Philip Weisskopf.

 


 

June 15, among the members of the B'nai El Choral Society were Miss Ruth Marglous and her sister Helen, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

July 27, Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Maizner, were the parents of a baby girl born July 24, 1917, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Sept. 14, the Jewish Voice reported that Mr. Samuel Kober had received a letter from his sister, Miss Flora Kober, who was in France in "active service" at U.S. Army Base Hospital Unit 21. Samuel told the newspaper that from the letter he could "see that she is doing considerable good work" as a nurse.

 


 

Oct. 5, a $5 donation from Isadore Maizner and a $3 donation from Herman Maizner were made to the Jewish War Sufferers Fund, according to the Jewish Voice.

 


 

Nov. 9, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous of 5401 Cabanne Ave. announced the engagement of their daughter Helen to Mr. Joe Bernstein of Moberly, Mo., the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Dec. 14, the Jewish Voice reported receiving a card from Miss Flora Kober, former Jewish Shelter Home matron who was serving on U.S. Army Base Hospital No. 21 in France.

 


 

1918:

 

Jan. 24, a thank you note dated Dec. 17 from a wounded British soldier in France was sent to Samuel Kober of 5774 Westminster Place in appreciation for  the box of cakes Kober sent to the men being cared for in Rouen, France, by Kober's sister, Flora Kober, a nurse with Washington University Hospital Unit No. 21. The soldier, Private E. Ladlow, praised the American doctors and nurses as "simply great. No better treatment and attention could be wished for," the Post-Dispatch reported.

 


 

April 19, the Jewish Voice announced that Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Marglous of 5075 Von Versen Ave. were moving to the Harlan Court Apartments, 5463 Delmar Ave.

 


 

May 31, Miss Helen Marglous, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous, was scheduled to marry Mr. Joseph Bernstein of St. Louis on June 4, 1918, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

June 21, the Jewish Voice listed members of the Daughters of Israel Society of the B'nai Amoona Congregation, including Mrs. Jeanette Daust, Mrs. Leo Dzialowsky and Mrs. L. Maizner.

 


 

Sept. 6, New Year greetings ads were published in the Jewish Voice by Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous and Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Marglous.

 


 

Dec. 14, the Jewish Voice reported a friend had received an "entertaining letter" from Miss Flora Kober, telling of her interesting experiences working at U.S. Army Base Hospital No. 21 in France. Miss Kober was planning to take a 10-day furlough in Paris with "her confrere," Miss May Auerbach.

 


 

Oct. 4, B'nai Amoona Congregation donors to the Jewish War Sufferers' Fund included A.J. Marglous, $25; Meyer Marglous, $25; Mrs. Dorris Marglous, $25; and Mrs. Jeanette Daust, $5, the Jewish Voice reported.

 


 

Oct. 11, Dr. and Mrs. Charles P. Grosby donated $25 to the Jewish War Sufferers Fund through Shaare Zedek Congregation, the Jewish Voice` noted.

 


 

Dec. 14, the Jewish Voice reported a friend had received an "entertaining letter" from Miss Flora Kober, telling of her interesting experiences working at U.S. Army Base Hospital No. 21 in France. Miss Kober was planning to take a 10-day furlough in Paris with "her confrere," Miss May Auerbach.

 


 

Dec. 27, Solomon Spieldoch, father of Mrs. Meyer Marglous, died on Dec. 23, 1918, in Vienna, the Jewish Voice reported. He was the husband of the late Marianna S. Spieldoch.

 


 

1919:

 

Jan. 10, Meyer Marglous of 5401 Cabanne Ave. was engaged to Ruth Cerf, daughter of Mrs. Lena Cerf of 5643 Waterman Ave., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Feb. 14, Mr. and Mrs. Isidor Maizner of 5660 Etzel Ave. celebrated their fifth wedding anniversary the previous Sunday with a family dinner, the Jewish Voice said.

 

The same issue reported the marriage on Feb. 11, 1919, of Miss Lena Cerf and Mr. Meyer Marglous, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous, at the bride's home, 5401 Cabanne Ave.

 


 

April 4, Samuel Kober shared with the Post-Dispatch a letter received from his sister, Flora Kober, noting that her Washington University Hospital Unit No. 21 had been staying at the Hotel Le Grand, Carnac, France, since March 20 and they were expecting orders any day to sail for home.

 


 

April 18, the Jewish Voice reported on the dedication the previous Sunday of the new B'nai Amoona Synagogue at Academy and Vernon Avenues. Mr. A.J. Marglous participated in the placement of the holy scrolls in the sanctuary.

 


 

May 2, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous donated the sacred scroll for the new B'nai Amoona Synagogue at Academy and Vernon Avenues, where Lag B'Omer would be celebrated on May 18, 1919, the Jewish Voice said.

 

The same Jewish Voice reported that a party was planned for May 8 in honor of Base Hospital Unit 21 of the Barnes Medical Hospital Corps, including Miss Flora Kober, which had returned from service in France.

 


 

May 16, Flora Kober, who had spent more than a year in hospital duty in France, was reported by the Jewish Voice to be spending a few weeks in New York on vacation before returning to home service.

 


 

June 13, the Jewish Voice reported that Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Marglous had left the Hamilton Hotel and were living in the Home Apartments, 5777 Westminster Pl.

 


 

June 20, Joseph Romansky donated $10 to the fund to aid victims of pogroms in Poland, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Oct. 24, Mrs. Israel Romansky was among the vice chairmen for fundraising efforts of the St. Louis Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society, the Post-Dispatch said.

 


 

Oct. 31, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Marglous had announced the engagement of their daughter Ruth and Mr. Erwin W. Cerf of 5653 Waterman Ave., the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

Dec. 12, among the team captains to collect donations for the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society listed in the Jewish Voice were Mrs. I. Maizner and Mrs. I. Romansky.

 


 

1920:

 

Feb. 20, Miss Ruth Marglous and Mr. Erwin W. Cerf were married in the bride's home on Feb. 17, 1920, the Jewish Voice said.

 


 

May 21, Elda Slupsky of 3852 Lindell Blvd. was among the children in the confirmation class at Shaare Emeth Temple, the Jewish Voice said. In a separate item in the same issue, Elda's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Slupsky, said they would receive their friends in honor of their daughter's confirmation in their home, 3852 Lindell Blvd., on Sunday, May 23, from 3 to 6 p.m.

 


 

May 28, a Jewish Voice article about the Shaare Emeth Temple confirmation ceremony the previous Sunday noted that Elda Slupsky had delivered a "Talk to the Class."

 


 

Aug. 17, the Post-Dispatch said that Fannie Romansky was among the children who participated in an amateur show that raised $79.40 for the Post-Dispatch Pure Milk and Free Ice Fund.

 


 

Sept. 24, Mrs. Jeanette Daust of 3222 Meramec St. announced the marriage of her daughter Miss Bianca Daust to Dr. S. Tyroler of Dayton, Ohio, the Jewish Voice said. After a honeymoon in Chicago, the couple planned to reside in St. Louis.

 


 

Oct. 22, Mrs. I. Maizner was identified as the vice chairman of the St. Louis Building Fund Committee for the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society, the Jewish Voice said.

 

The same issue of the newspaper published a list of donations to B'nai Amoona Congregation's War Sufferers' Fund including the following: Henry Knoch, $200; Jacob Slupsky, $50; Herman Maizner, $10; and I. Maizner, $5.

 


 

Nov. 16, officials of Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol, an Orthodox Jewish congregation, attempted to purchase property on Thornby Place at Bartmer Avenue in order to relocate their place of worship from 1123-25 N. 11th Street, the Post-Dispatch reported. But residents of the neighborhood organized the Bartmer-Thornby Association and purchased the desired property for $8,400, which was $400 more than the congregation had offered. In response, Joseph Romansky purchased the 12-room frame house at 5877 Bartmer Ave., a half-block west of Thornby Place, and the congregation had been conducting religious services there for the previous three weeks.

 


 

1921:

 

Jan. 16, according to the Post-Dispatch, the Harris-Kober Diamond Importing Co., which was located on the second floor of the Commercial Building, had leased the second floor of the Republic Building.

 


 

April 7, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Knoch and their daughter, Mercedes, had moved from the Usona Hotel to their new home at 745 Westgate Ave., University City, according to the Post-Dispatch.

 


 

July 11, Mercedes Knoch and two other little girls living in the 700 block of Westgate Avenue raised $3.65 from a miscellaneous sale for the Post-Dispatch Pure Milk and Free Ice Fund.

 


 

July 15, Mrs. Theresa Feinetti of Belleville, Ill., hurrying to catch a streetcar at Page Boulevard and Grand Avenue, received a scalp wound and bruises when she was struck by a car driven by Samuel Kober of 5789 Westminster Pl.

 


 

 

1922:

 

Feb. 10, Samuel Kober, Louis K. Harris, Samuel Kessler and Harry Fleischman were the targets of a lawsuit seeking $150,000 in damages filed by trustees of the Republic Housing and Investment Corp., which had receive authorization on Jan. 10 to conduct business from the State Finance Commission, the Post-Dispatch said.  Plaintiffs alleged that Kober and the others conspired to urge investors in the business to withdraw their money.

 


 

Feb. 12, in a follow up to the Feb. 10 announcement of the lawsuit against Samuel Kober, Louis K. Harris and others, the Post-Dispatch noted that the plaintiff, the Republic Housing and Investment Corp., and Kober's business, the Harris-Kober Diamond Importing Co., were located side-by-side on the second floor of the Republic Building. The principals of the diamond business had originally participated in Republic and had modified their lease in order for the latter to locate in the building. The Kober-Harris faction had helped secure more than $400,000 in funding for Republic and had been under the impression that they would have a say over the the company's personnel. But the Kober-Harris group were surprised to learn that the firm had obtained a state charter with William R. Edison, Gustave Moritz, William P. Moss, M.B. Lippman and Harry Stahl as perpetual trustees and officers. In response, the Harris-Kober group demanded their money back. On Feb. 11, a judge issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting withdrawal of any of the funds in question from Republic National Bank.

 


 

April 7, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Knoch and their daughter, Mercedes, were spending the summer in California, the Post-Dispatch reported.

 


 

Oct. 12, a cottage at 4140 Louisiana Avenue had been purchased by Louis F. Kober, the Post-Dispatch reported.

 


 

Dec. 31, the Post-Dispatch published an article saying that Philipp G. Weisskopf, 21, was recovering from two pistol wounds after being shot allegedly by R.T. Green of Traube, Texas, at the railroad station in Timpson, Texas. There was no reason given for the shooting, for which Green was under arrest, the Associated Press report said. Weisskopf, a traveling representative for a St. Louis cloak company, was struck in the stomach and arm. The shooting was witnessed by a crowd, and a bystander was also wounded in an arm. Weisskopf lives with his widowed mother, Mrs. Caroline Weisskopf, at 4462 Greer Ave. She told the Post-Dispatch that she had never heard her son mention R.T. Green.

 


 

Home

Home | Site map | About us |Contact us

 

 

 

 

Experienced amateur genealogist Martin Fischer is available to conduct freelance family history projects including searching online databases, creating family trees, editing memoirs and developing genealogical Web sites. For more information, go to http://www.the-efa.org/, click on find a freelancer, and type Martin Fischer in the search box, or go to http://www.apgen.org/, click on search by name, and type Fischer and Martin in the search boxes.

  View Martin Fischer's profile on LinkedIn